Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

World-first quantum computer simulation of chemical bonds using trapped ions

25.07.2018

An international group of researchers has achieved the world’s first multi-qubit demonstration of a quantum chemistry calculation performed on a system of trapped ions, one of the leading hardware platforms in the race to develop a universal quantum computer.

The research, led by Cornelius Hempel and Thomas Monz, explores a promising pathway for developing effective ways to model chemical bonds and reactions using quantum computers. “Even the largest supercomputers are struggling to model accurately anything but the most basic chemistry. Quantum computers simulating nature, however, unlock a whole new way of understanding matter. They will provide us with a new tool to solve problems in materials science, medicine and industrial chemistry using simulations”, says Cornelius Hempel, now at the University of Sydney.


Researchers simulated the energy bonds of molecular hydrogen and lithium hydride.

IQOQI Innsbruck/Harald Ritsch


The laboratory of the group led by Rainer Blatt at the IQOQI Innsbruck

IQOQI Innsbruck/M. R. Knabl

With quantum computing still in its infancy, it remains unclear exactly what problems these devices will be most effective at solving, but most experts agree that quantum chemistry is going to be one of the first ‘killer apps’ of this emergent technology.

Broad application for quantum chemistry

Quantum chemistry is the science of understanding the complicated bonds and reactions of molecules using quantum mechanics. The ‘moving parts’ of anything but the most-simple chemical processes are beyond the capacity of the biggest and fastest supercomputers.

By modelling and understanding these processes using quantum computers, scientists expect to unlock lower-energy pathways for chemical reactions, allowing the design of new catalysts. This will have huge implications for industries, such as the production of fertilizers. Other possible applications include the development of organic solar cells and better batteries through improved materials and using new insights to design personalized medicines.

Simple chemical bond simulated

The team at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Innsbruck, Austria, used just four qubits on a 20-qubit device to run algorithms to simulate the energy bonds of molecular hydrogen and lithium hydride. These relatively simple molecules are chosen as they are well understood and can be simulated using classical computers. This allows scientists to check the results provided by the quantum computers under development.

Dr Hempel said: “This is an important stage of the development of this technology as it is allowing us to set benchmarks, look for errors and plan necessary improvements.” Instead of aiming for the most accurate or largest simulation to date, the researchers’ work focused on what can go wrong in a promising quantum-classical hybrid algorithm known as variational quantum eigensolver or VQE.

By looking at different ways to encode the chemistry problem, the researchers are after ways to suppress errors that arise in today's imperfect quantum computers and stand in the way of near-term usefulness of those machines.

“Besides superconducting quantum bits, ion-trap technology is the leading platform for the development of a quantum computer," says Rainer Blatt, a quantum computer pioneer from Innsbruck. “Quantum chemistry is an example where the advantages of a quantum computer will very soon become apparent in practical applications.”

The results of the research groups led by Rainer Blatt and the American chemist Alán Aspuru-Guzik have now been published in the journal Physical Review X and were supported by the Austrian Science Fund FWF and the European Commission, among others.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Dr. Thomas Monz
Department of Experimental Physics
University of Innsbruck
phone: +43 512 507 52452
email: thomas.monz@uibk.ac.at
web: https://quantumoptics.at

Originalpublikation:

Quantum chemistry calculations on a trapped-ion quantum simulator. Cornelius Hempel, Christine Maier, Jonathan Romero, Jarrod McClean, Thomas Monz, Heng Shen, Petar Jurcevic, Ben Lanyon, Peter Love, Ryan Babbush, Alán Aspuru-Guzik, Rainer Blatt, Christian Roos. Physical Review X 2018 DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevX.8.031022 (arXiv: https://arxiv.org/abs/1803.10238)

Weitere Informationen:

https://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevX.8.031022 - Quantum chemistry calculations on a trapped-ion quantum simulator. Cornelius Hempel, Christine Maier, Jonathan Romero, Jarrod McClean, Thomas Monz, Heng Shen, Petar Jurcevic, Ben Lanyon, Peter Love, Ryan Babbush, Alán Aspuru-Guzik, Rainer Blatt, Christian Roos. Physical Review X 2018
https://quantumoptics.at - Quantum Optics and Spectroscopy group
http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/cornelius.hempel.php - Dr Cornelius Hempel

Dr. Christian Flatz | Universität Innsbruck

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht New method gives microscope a boost in resolution
10.12.2018 | Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum für Experimentelle Biomedizin der Universität Würzburg

nachricht A new 'spin' on kagome lattices
10.12.2018 | Boston College

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>