Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ultrafast particle interactions could help make quantum information devices feasible

17.10.2019

Research presents the detection of energy transfer from excited electrons to the crystal lattice on the femtosecond timescale. Knowledge could contribute to the development of materials that prolong the coherence time

Energy is information. Lengthening the time during which a system is capable of retaining energy before losing it to the local environment is a key goal for the development of quantum information. This interval is called the "coherence time". Several studies have been performed with the aim of retarding decoherence.


Knowledge could contribute to the development of materials that prolong the coherence time.

image: researcher archive

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Campinas's Gleb Wataghin Institute of Physics (IFGW-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, in partnership with colleagues at the University of Michigan's Physics Department in Ann Arbor, USA, and Sungkyunkwan University's Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT SKKU) in Seoul, South Korea, set out to understand the decoherence process on the femtosecond (10-15 s) timescale. An article describing the results was published in Physical Review Letters.

In the study, interactions between excitons (excited electrons) and phonons (quantum units of vibrational energy in a crystal lattice) were observed on the femtosecond timescale. A femtosecond is one quadrillionth of a second.

The use of a revolutionary ultrafast spectroscopy technique with high temporal and spectral resolution was fundamental to the success of the study, which was supported by FAPESP via a Young Investigator Grant awarded to Lázaro Aurélio Padilha Junior and a project conducted in partnership with the University of Michigan under the aegis of the São Paulo Research Foundation - FAPESP program São Paulo Researchers in International Collaboration (SPRINT).

Padilha was one of the principal investigators for the project, and Diogo Burigo Almeida, then a postdoctoral fellow at Michigan, was one of the main authors. The experiment was performed with semiconducting nanocrystals dispersed in a colloidal solution at cryogenic temperatures.

"We found that when the material is excited [by light], the light it emits changes color in under 200 femtoseconds. This is due to interaction between excitons and phonons. The excitons transfer part of the energy they receive to the crystal lattice. This causes a change of frequency and hence a change of emission color," Padilha told.

Their study was the first to observe this phenomenon. "It had never been observed before because the amount of energy transferred from each exciton to the lattice is tiny, corresponding to 26 millielectron volts (26x10-3 eV), and the process takes a very short time, lasting under 200 femtoseconds (200x10-15 s). Similar phenomena have been observed but on far greater timescales and due to other processes. We accessed hitherto unknown physical relations," he said.

He and his research group long studied semiconductor nanomaterials with sizes between 1 nanometer and 10 nm. A major challenge arises when promoting the growth of these materials, as each individual unit grows differently; hence, the spectrum of light emitted by the material after excitation is broadened, with the various components emitting at slightly different frequencies, and the color of the emission is less precise. When a single particle is isolated, the spectrum becomes narrower, but signal detection is retarded. In other words, spectral resolution is enhanced but at the loss of temporal resolution.

"About five years ago we began working with a technique that can pick out subsets comprising a few thousand identical particles from a set of 1020 nm particles," Padilha said. "This has enabled us to achieve very fine and precise spectral resolution, as well as fine temporal resolution. In this study, we obtained single-particle spectral resolution for a group of particles in an exceptionally short time."

As noted, this experimental solution enabled the researchers to access hitherto unknown physical processes, such as the ultrafast exciton-phonon interaction. It is worth recalling that in condensed matter physics, the phonon is a quasi-particle associated with the quantum of vibration that propagates in a crystal lattice.

There are no immediate technological applications for the results obtained, but in the not-too-distant future, knowledge of physical interactions on the femtosecond timescale can help scientists control the structure of materials such that excitons retain energy from electrical or light impulses for longer periods, retarding decoherence in quantum systems.

"Prolonging coherence is key to the success of devices such as optical switches and single-photon emitters," Almeida said. "Actually, what you aim to do is reduce energy waste to a minimum. When the material changes color, it means it's losing energy. We discovered that this loss is extremely fast. That's what we want to delay."

###

About São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)

The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) is a public institution with the mission of supporting scientific research in all fields of knowledge by awarding scholarships, fellowships and grants to investigators linked with higher education and research institutions in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. FAPESP is aware that the very best research can only be done by working with the best researchers internationally. Therefore, it has established partnerships with funding agencies, higher education, private companies, and research organizations in other countries known for the quality of their research and has been encouraging scientists funded by its grants to further develop their international collaboration. You can learn more about FAPESP at http://www.fapesp.br/en and visit FAPESP news agency at http://www.agencia.fapesp.br/en to keep updated with the latest scientific breakthroughs FAPESP helps achieve through its many programs, awards and research centers. You may also subscribe to FAPESP news agency at http://agencia.fapesp.br/subscribe.

Media Contact

Joao Carlos Silva
jsilva@fapesp.br
55-113-838-4381

 @AgencyFAPESP

http://www.fapesp.br 

Joao Carlos Silva | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://agencia.fapesp.br/31657/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/physrevlett.123.057403

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht FAST detects neutral hydrogen emission from extragalactic galaxies for the first time
02.07.2020 | Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters

nachricht First exposed planetary core discovered
01.07.2020 | Universität Bern

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

Im Focus: ILA Goes Digital – Automation & Production Technology for Adaptable Aircraft Production

Live event – July 1, 2020 - 11:00 to 11:45 (CET)
"Automation in Aerospace Industry @ Fraunhofer IFAM"

The Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM l Stade is presenting its forward-looking R&D portfolio for the first time at...

Im Focus: AI monitoring of laser welding processes - X-ray vision and eavesdropping ensure quality

With an X-ray experiment at the European Synchrotron ESRF in Grenoble (France), Empa researchers were able to demonstrate how well their real-time acoustic monitoring of laser weld seams works. With almost 90 percent reliability, they detected the formation of unwanted pores that impair the quality of weld seams. Thanks to a special evaluation method based on artificial intelligence (AI), the detection process is completed in just 70 milliseconds.

Laser welding is a process suitable for joining metals and thermoplastics. It has become particularly well established in highly automated production, for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species

03.07.2020 | Life Sciences

Risk of infection with COVID-19 from singing: First results of aerosol study with the Bavarian Radio Chorus

03.07.2020 | Studies and Analyses

Efficient, Economical and Aesthetic: Researchers Build Electrodes from Leaves

03.07.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>