Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech

17.01.2019

World first experiments on sensor that may revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles

The new sensor - capable of detecting vibrations of living cells - may revolutionise everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles.


Image of ultrasound sensor.

Credit: University of Queensland

World first experiments at the University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the first ultraprecise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip.

According to lead author Dr Sahar Basiri-Esfahani, a Sêr Cymru II Fellow at Swansea University, the impressive accuracy of the technology may change how we understand biology.

"We'll soon have the ability to listen to the sound emitted by living bacteria and cells," she said.

"This is a particularly attractive application, as it could fundamentally improve our understanding of how these small biological systems function," "And a deeper understanding of these biological systems may lead to new treatments, so we're looking forward to seeing what future applications emerge." Dr Basiri-Esfahani said.

Professor Warwick Bowen, from UQ's Precision Sensing Initiative and the Australian Centre for Engineered Quantum Systems said that the leap forward may usher in a host of exciting new technologies. "This is a major step forward, since accurate ultrasound measurement is critical for a range of applications," he said.

"Ultrasound is currently used for medical ultrasound, commonly to examine pregnant women, as well as for high resolution biomedical imaging to detect tumours and other anomalies.

"It's also commonly used for spatial applications, like in the sonar imaging of underwater objects or in the navigation of unmanned aerial vehicles. "Improving these applications requires smaller higher precision sensors, and with this new technique, that's exactly what we've been able to develop."

The new ultrasound-sensing technology, for the first time, reaches the regime where its noise is dominated by the random miniscule forces from surrounding air molecules.

"We've developed a near perfect ultrasound detector, hitting the limits of what the technology is actually capable of achieving," Professor Bowen said.

"We're now able to measure ultrasound waves that apply tiny forces - comparable to the gravitational force on a virus - and we can do this with sensors smaller than a millimetre across."

###

The research was supported by the Australian Research Council, the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions COFUND), the Welsh Government through the European Regional Development Fund (Sêr Cymru Programme), and the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Media Contact

Delyth Purchase
d.purchase@swansea.ac.uk
01-792-513-022

 @swanseauni

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/ 

Delyth Purchase | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://www.swansea.ac.uk/press-office/latest-research/ultraultrasoundtotransformnewtech.php
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-08038-4

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Exotic spiraling electrons discovered by physicists
19.02.2019 | Rutgers University

nachricht Astronomers publish new sky map detecting hundreds of thousands of previously unknown galaxies
19.02.2019 | Universität Bielefeld

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light from a roll – hybrid OLED creates innovative and functional luminous surfaces

Up to now, OLEDs have been used exclusively as a novel lighting technology for use in luminaires and lamps. However, flexible organic technology can offer much more: as an active lighting surface, it can be combined with a wide variety of materials, not just to modify but to revolutionize the functionality and design of countless existing products. To exemplify this, the Fraunhofer FEP together with the company EMDE development of light GmbH will be presenting hybrid flexible OLEDs integrated into textile designs within the EU-funded project PI-SCALE for the first time at LOPEC (March 19-21, 2019 in Munich, Germany) as examples of some of the many possible applications.

The Fraunhofer FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, has long been involved in the development of...

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New mechanisms regulating neural stem cells

21.02.2019 | Life Sciences

Rising CO2 has unforeseen strong impact on Arctic plant productivity

21.02.2019 | Studies and Analyses

A landscape of mammalian development

21.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>