Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers

16.10.2019

A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna)

It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to glow in a highly unusual fashion.


Local distortions in the surface push electrons close to defects. Only the combination of defects and strain can explain the new kind of quantum light.

Credit: TU Wien

In addition to ordinary light, which other semiconductor materials can emit too, tungsten diselenide also produces a very special type of bright quantum light, which is created only at specific points of the material. It consists of a series of photons that are always emitted one-by-one - never in pairs or in bunches.

This anti-bunching effect is perfect for experiments in the field of quantum information and quantum cryptography, where single photons are required. However, for years this emission has remained a mystery.

At the TU Vienna an explanation has now been found: A subtle interaction of single atomic defects in the material and mechanical strain is responsible for this quantum light effect. Computer simulations show how the electrons are driven to specific places in the material, where they are captured by a defect, lose energy and emit a photon. The solution to the quantum light puzzle has now been published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Only three atoms thick

Tungsten diselenide is a so-called "two-dimensional material" that forms extremely thin layers. Such layers are only three atomic layers thick: there are tungsten atoms in the middle, coupled to selenium atoms below and above. "If energy is supplied to the layer, for example by applying an electrical voltage or by irradiating it with light of a suitable wavelength, it begins to shine," explains Lukas Linhart from the Institute of Theoretical Physics at the TU Vienna.

"This in itself is not unusual, many materials do that. However, when the light emitted by tungsten diselenide was analysed in detail, in addition to ordinary light a special type of light with very unusual properties was detected."

This special nature quantum light consists of photons of specific wavelengths - and they are always emitted individually. It never happens that two photons of the same wavelength are detected at the same time.

"This tells us that these photons cannot be produced randomly in the material, but that there must be certain points in the tungsten diselenide sample that produce many of these photons, one after the other", explains Prof. Florian Libisch, spokesperson of the Graduate School TU-D at the TU Vienna with a focus on two-dimensional materials.

Explaining this effect requires the detailed understanding of the behaviour of the electrons in the material on a quantum physical level. Electrons in tungsten diselenide can occupy different energy states. If an electron changes from a state of high energy to a state of lower energy, a photon is emitted. However, this jump to a lower energy is not always allowed: The electron has to adhere to certain laws - the conservation of momentum and angular momentum.

Defects and distortions

Due to these conservation laws, an electron in a high energy quantum state must remain there - unless certain imperfections in the material allow the energy states to change. "A tungsten diselenide layer is never perfect. In some places one or more selenium atoms may be missing," says Lukas Linhart. "This also changes the energy of the electron states in this region."

Moreover, the material layer is not a perfect plane. Like a blanket that wrinkles when spread over a pillow, tungsten diselenide stretches locally when the material layer is suspended on small support structures. These mechanical stresses also have an effect on the electronic energy states.

"The interaction of material defects and local strains is complicated. However, we have now succeeded in simulating both effects on a computer" says Lukas Linhart. "And it turns out that only the combination of these effects can explain the strange light effects." At those microscopic regions of the material, where defects and surface strains appear together, the energy levels of the electrons change from a high to a low energy state and emit a photon. The laws of quantum physics do not allow two electrons to be in exactly the same state at the same time, and therefore the electrons must undergo this process one by one. This leads to the photons being emitted one by one as well.

At the same time, the mechanical distortion of the material helps to accumulate a large number of electrons in the vicinity of the defect, so that another electron is readily available to step in after the last one has changed its state and emitted a photon.

This result illustrates that ultrathin 2D materials open up completely new possibilities for materials science.

###

Contact

Prof. Florian Libisch
Institute for Theoretical Physics
TU Wien
Wiener Hauptstraße 8-10, Vienna
T +43-1-58801-13608
florian.libisch@tuwien.ac.at

Dipl.-Ing. Lukas Linhart
Institute for Theoretical Physics
TU Wien
Wiener Hauptstraße 8-10, Vienna
T +43-1-58801-13655
lukas.linhart@tuwien.ac.at

Florian Aigner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://www.tuwien.at/en/tu-wien/news/news-articles/news/solving-the-mystery-of-quantum-light-in-thin-layers/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.146401

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Beyond the brim, Sombrero Galaxy's halo suggests turbulent past
21.02.2020 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht 10,000 times faster calculations of many-body quantum dynamics possible
21.02.2020 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

Im Focus: Skyrmions like it hot: Spin structures are controllable even at high temperatures

Investigation of the temperature dependence of the skyrmion Hall effect reveals further insights into possible new data storage devices

The joint research project of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) that had previously demonstrated...

Im Focus: Making the internet more energy efficient through systemic optimization

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently completed a 5-year research project looking at how to make fibre optic communications systems more energy efficient. Among their proposals are smart, error-correcting data chip circuits, which they refined to be 10 times less energy consumptive. The project has yielded several scientific articles, in publications including Nature Communications.

Streaming films and music, scrolling through social media, and using cloud-based storage services are everyday activities now.

Im Focus: New synthesis methods enhance 3D chemical space for drug discovery

After helping develop a new approach for organic synthesis -- carbon-hydrogen functionalization -- scientists at Emory University are now showing how this approach may apply to drug discovery. Nature Catalysis published their most recent work -- a streamlined process for making a three-dimensional scaffold of keen interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

"Our tools open up whole new chemical space for potential drug targets," says Huw Davies, Emory professor of organic chemistry and senior author of the paper.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

NUI Galway highlights reproductive flexibility in hydractinia, a Galway bay jellyfish

24.02.2020 | Life Sciences

KIST researchers develop high-capacity EV battery materials that double driving range

24.02.2020 | Materials Sciences

How earthquakes deform gravity

24.02.2020 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>