Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smooth propagation of spin waves using gold

26.06.2017

The generation mechanism of spin wave noise and the suppression method

Assistant Professor Taichi Goto at Toyohashi University of Technology elucidated the noise generation mechanism of the spin wave (SW), the wave of a magnetic moment transmitted through magnetic oxide, and established a way to suppress it. The large noise generated by SWs traveling through magnetic oxides has presented a significant obstacle to its applications. However, it became clear that noise can be suppressed by installing a thin gold film in the appropriate places. This method is expected to be applied to SW devices such as multi-input and multi-output phase interference devices for SWs. The research results were reported in Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics on June 15, 2017.


This is a magnetic oxide film treated with gold film capable of suppressing SW noise.

COPYRIGHT (C) TOYOHASHI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Recent electronic devices using semiconductor materials are having difficulty meeting the demand of a rapidly growing information society due to issues such as a high chip temperature due to high integration. Development of an SW logic circuit that can process information, and significantly suppress heat generation through transmitting only SWs without transferring electrons themselves, has been attracting attention. SWs that propagate through magnetic oxides have the advantage of low energy loss and a long transmission distance. On the other hand, as the loss is so small, SW reflected at the end of the material or interface with the electrode disturb the target spin wave. This phenomenon is called SW noise, which has made SW unsuitable for application in the past.

The Spin Electronics Group of Toyohashi University of Technology discovered that forming a gold film with sufficient length at the end of an yttrium iron garnet (YIG), which is a well-known magnetic oxide material, suppresses the generation of unnecessary SWs. In addition, the group found for the first time that SW noise is also sensitive to the position of the gold film.

... more about:
»electrode »electrodes »split »waves »yttrium

"There are series of new devices using SWs and findings of new phenomena, yet there hasn't been much research on finding out how to transmit SWs through magnetic oxide or elucidating the cause of the generation of disturbing SWs.", said Assistant Professor Goto.

The first author master course student Shimada who ran the simulation said, "We analyzed the fundamental propagation characteristics of the structure using gold film. Since this method can significantly suppress the noise, it will contribute to the development of SW devices that use magnetic oxide. Furthermore, SW logic circuits that use phase information can be realized as the phases of waves are stabilized." SW propagation characteristics were calculated and analyzed based on the finite element analysis method, by computer generating a three-dimensional model that has the same size as the sample used in the actual experiment. A model with a pair of electrodes for exciting SWs and a gold film for removing noise placed on the magnetic oxide was used to find out how gold film affects SW propagation by comprehensively changing the length of magnetic oxide materials, the position of the gold film, and the distance from the electrode. The result showed that when the distance between the gold film and the electrodes is long, a standing wave of SWs is generated, causing strong noise. The group learned that the noise can be suppressed by positioning the gold film close enough to the electrodes. This helps smoothen the propagation characteristics, and realizes a stable element design that can keep the influence of some frequency variations and disturbances to the entire device, to the propagation characteristics, small.

This simulation is a known method with high reproducibility. Therefore, the method is expected to be applied to SW devices such as multi-input/multi-output phase interference devices for SW in the future.

###

Funding agency:

This work supported by Grants-in-Aid for PRESTO Program (JPMJPR1524) from JST, KAKENHI (Nos. 26706009?26220902?25820124) from JSPS, and Program for Advancing Strategic International Networks to Accelerate the Circulation of Talented Researchers (No. R2802) from JSPS.

Reference:

Kei Shimada, Taichi Goto, Naoki Kanazawa, Hiroyuki Takagi, Yuichi Nakamura, Hironaga Uchida and Mitsuteru Inoue, "Extremely flat transmission band of forward volume spin wave using gold and yttrium iron garnet", 2017 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 50 275001. https://doi.org/10.1088/1361-6463/aa7505

Media Contact

Yuko Ito
press@office.tut.ac.jp

Toyohashi University of Technology - Google-Suche

https://www.tut.ac.jp/english/

Yuko Ito | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: electrode electrodes split waves yttrium

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Explained: Why water droplets 'bounce off the walls'
27.02.2020 | University of Warwick

nachricht Scientists 'film' a quantum measurement
26.02.2020 | Stockholm University

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: High-pressure scientists in Bayreuth discover promising material for information technology

Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have discovered an unusual material: When cooled down to two degrees Celsius, its crystal structure and electronic properties change abruptly and significantly. In this new state, the distances between iron atoms can be tailored with the help of light beams. This opens up intriguing possibilities for application in the field of information technology. The scientists have presented their discovery in the journal "Angewandte Chemie - International Edition". The new findings are the result of close cooperation with partnering facilities in Augsburg, Dresden, Hamburg, and Moscow.

The material is an unusual form of iron oxide with the formula Fe₅O₆. The researchers produced it at a pressure of 15 gigapascals in a high-pressure laboratory...

Im Focus: From China to the South Pole: Joining forces to solve the neutrino mass puzzle

Study by Mainz physicists indicates that the next generation of neutrino experiments may well find the answer to one of the most pressing issues in neutrino physics

Among the most exciting challenges in modern physics is the identification of the neutrino mass ordering. Physicists from the Cluster of Excellence PRISMA+ at...

Im Focus: Therapies without drugs

Fraunhofer researchers are investigating the potential of microimplants to stimulate nerve cells and treat chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, or Parkinson’s disease. Find out what makes this form of treatment so appealing and which challenges the researchers still have to master.

A study by the Robert Koch Institute has found that one in four women will suffer from weak bladders at some point in their lives. Treatments of this condition...

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bacteria loop-the-loop

27.02.2020 | Life Sciences

Project on microorganisms: Saci, the bio-factory

27.02.2020 | Life Sciences

New method converts carbon dioxide to methane at low temperatures

27.02.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>