Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Simulation of Chiral Edge States in a Quantum System

25.09.2015

Researchers in Florence and Innsbruck have simulated a physical phenomenon in an atomic quantum gas that can also be observed at the edge of some condensed matter systems: chiral currents. The scientists have published the experiment, which will open new doors for the study of exotic states in condensed matter, in the journal Science.

Condensed matter physics remains a field of study with many puzzles to solve. New studies have become possible due to advances in experimental quantum physics.


Theoretiker Marcello Dalmonte (Foto: Uni Innsbruck)

In particular, ultracold atoms in optical lattices and an environment that is fully tunable and controllable represent an ideal system for studying the physics of condensed matter problems. One of these phenomena can be observed in connection with the quantum Hall effect:

When certain materials are subjected to a strong magnetic field, the electrons cannot move in a singular circular direction at the edges anymore but repeatedly bounce against the edge, where they are reflected. This corresponds to skipping trajectories. As a macroscopic consequence so called chiral currents, which move in the opposite direction at the opposite edges, can be observed at the boundaries of such two-dimensional materials.

... more about:
»QUANTUM »Simulation »matter physics »synthetic

“You could compare it to a river where the fish swim towards the right on one bank and towards the left on the other bank,” explains theoretical physicist Marcello Dalmonte from the Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of Innsbruck and a member of Peter Zoller’s research group at the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Hopping atoms

Already ten years ago, Peter Zoller’s research team proposed a way to simulate chiral currents with neutral atoms. This idea combined with the synthetic dimension approach, put forward by the Barcelona group at ICFO, was picked up and implemented by physicists at the European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy (LENS) in Florence collaborating with theoretical physicists in Innsbruck.

In their experiment, the scientists confined an ultracold gas of ytterbium atoms in an optical lattice generated by laser beams. As it is difficult to reproduce the structure of two-dimensional condensed matter systems, the physicists use a new approach: They used a one-dimensional chain of atoms and produced the second dimension synthetically. The dynamics along the synthetic dimension are generated by laser-induced hopping between two or three internal spin states.

“From a theoretical perspective this hopping into different internal spin states represents the same concept as the geometrical hopping of electrons at the edges of a condensed matter system,” explains Marcello Dalmonte. Together with Marie Rider and Peter Zoller, Marcello Dalmonte laid the theoretical groundwork for the experiment and suggested how to observe this phenomenon.

The observations published in Science show that the particles move mostly to the right at one edge and to the left on the other edge. “This behavior is very similar to chiral currents known in condensed matter physics,” says Dalmonte. This simulation of exotic effects opens up new ways for the researchers to study other new physical phenomena, for example, in connection with quantum Hall effects, the study of anyons in atomic systems. These exotic quasi particles are suggested to being suitable as the main building block for topological quantum computers.

The researchers are supported, among others, by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF), the European Research Council (ERC) and the European Union.

Publikation: Observation of chiral edge states with neutral fermions in synthetic Hall ribbons. M. Mancini, G. Pagano, G. Cappellini, L. Livi, M. Rider, J. Catani, C. Sias, P. Zoller, M. Inguscio, M. Dalmonte, L. Fallani. Science, Vol. 349 no. 6255 pp. 1510-1513
doi: 10.1126/science.aaa8736

Contact:
Marcello Dalmonte
Institute for Theoretical Physics
Universtity of Innsbruck and
Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information
Austrian Academy of Sciences
Tel.: +43 512 507 4792
E-Mail: marcello.dalmonte@uibk.ac.at

Dr. Christian Flatz
Public Relations
Tel.: +43 512 507 32022
Mobil: +43 676 872532022
E-Mail: christian.flatz@uibk.ac.at

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uibk.ac.at/th-physik/qo/ - Quantum Optics Theory Group
http://www.uibk.ac.at/th-physik/ - Institute for Theoretical Physics, Universtity of Innsbruck
http://iqoqi.at/ - Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information
http://Austrian Academy of Sciences
http://www.lens.unifi.it/ - European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy (LENS)

Dr. Christian Flatz | Universität Innsbruck
Further information:
http://www.uibk.ac.at

Further reports about: QUANTUM Simulation matter physics synthetic

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor
11.12.2018 | Science China Press

nachricht Physicists edge closer to controlling chemical reactions
11.12.2018 | Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

11.12.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>