Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

From Earth to Space and back - IAC Valencia

04.10.2006
ESA is presenting current and future European space activities at the 57th International Astronautical Congress (IAC) this week in Valencia. For IAC week the city of Valencia has been transformed into a meeting place for key people engaged in space, including policy makers, professionals and academics, research institutions, universities, industry, media and general public.

Every year, the International Astronautical Congress (IAC) is organised by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF) and its associates, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) and the International Institute of Space Law (IISL).

The ESA exhibition allows visitors to discover European space activities, popularising the most recent planetary missions with stunning data from Mars, Titan, Venus and the Moon. The visual impact aims to convey the excitement of such recent discoveries to the public and encourage them to take a greater interest in the fascinating world of space, science and technology.

Playing with different light effects in green, blue and red, the ‘From Earth to Space and Back!’ exhibition invites visitors on a journey into space to discover the important questions being addressed by European space strategy for the coming years.

The exhibition opened on Monday 2 October in the morning and will be visited by professionals from the international space community until Friday 6 October. The public are also invited to visit every afternoon from 15.00 to 18.00.

From Earth to Space and Back! is organised around three main themes: space for daily life, European space infrastructure, and the discovery of new frontiers.

Space for daily life presents European programmes for observing the Earth and solutions to environmental concerns, satellite telecommunications and the new European satellite navigation system, Galileo.

The space infrastructure area shows Europe’s contribution to the International Space Station, including the Automatic Transfer Vehicle, ATV, and focuses on ESA astronaut Thomas Reiter’s long-duration mission on board the ISS. ESA also presents its launchers Ariane 5 and Vega and current plans to launch the Russian-built Soyuz from Europe’s spaceport.

ESA’s missions to the Solar System are presented within the framework of Cosmic Vision, its long term scientific programme, showing the latest results from Mars Express, Venus Express, Huygens and Smart-1.

A special thematic display within the public area of the museum is dedicated to ExoMars, the first ESA rover to visit Mars and the first mission within ESA’s programme for future exploration of the Solar System.

A dedicated programme of events targets young professionals attending the IAC, which is also open to the general public.

Programme

Tuesday 3 October, 16.00-17.00
ESA’s ambitious programme for future exploration of the solar system.
Wednesday 4 October, 16.00-17.00
ESA’s Advanced Studies: new concepts for space
Thursday 5 October
Launchers in Europe
IAC 2006 exhibition
Principe Felipe Science Museum
City of Arts and Sciences
Valencia, Spain
The exhibition is open to the general public:
Monday 2 October – Thursday 5 October from 15:00 -19.00
Friday 6 October from 09.00 – 17.00

Maria Menendez | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM5XRKKKSE_index_0.html

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht What happens when we heat the atomic lattice of a magnet all of a sudden?
18.07.2018 | Forschungsverbund Berlin

nachricht Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino
16.07.2018 | National Institutes of Natural Sciences

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

19.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

NSF-supported researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences

Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells

19.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>