Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A FASTT first from the Office of Naval Research

30.12.2005


First air-breathing, liquid fuel-powered scramjet takes flight



Before the sun had even risen over Wallops Island, Va., on 10 December 2005, a joint Office of Naval Research/Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency vehicle achieved a world first. At an altitude of 63,000 feet, the Freeflight Atmospheric Scramjet Test Technique (FASTT) vehicle became the first air-breathing, liquid hydrocarbon fuel-powered scramjet engine to fly.

After launching from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility on a two-stage, Terrier-Orion unguided solid-rocket system, the approximately 106-inch long, 11-inch diameter, missile-shaped vehicle raced at 5,300 feet per second (Mach 5.5) for 15 seconds before a controlled splashdown into the Atlantic Ocean. The FASTT vehicle project is part of the joint ONR/DARPA Hypersonic Flight Demonstration (HyFly) program and is designed to demonstrate low-cost flight test techniques and obtain in-flight engine performance data at hypersonic speeds. The overall goal of HyFly is to flight-test key technologies enabling a long range, high-speed cruise missile that can cruise at speeds up to Mach 6.


A scramjet is a supersonic combustion ramjet. Ramjets, which use low subsonic combustion are limited in speed capability. Scramjets have the ability to operate above Mach 5. The hybrid engines of HyFly have no moving parts and offer a lighter weight alternative to other types of propulsion systems. Instead of carrying an oxygen tank, air passing through the vehicle is mixed with fuel. The HyFly program is based on a hybrid scramjet technology called the dual combustor ramjet, developed at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. In this powerplant, supersonic air entering through one inlet is slowed to subsonic speeds, mixed with JP-10 fuel and ignited. The expanding combustion products are then mixed with supersonic air entering through a second inlet and are more completely burned in a supersonic combustor.

By using a conventional fuel and not relying on toxic additives as do other scramjet designs, this engine is safer for shipboard use. It can be powered all the way to the target, and that target or its coordinates can be changed as necessary. The test program will culminate in successful tests of sustained flight at Mach 6, thereby demonstrating the readiness of key technologies such as the liquid-hydrocarbon fueled hybrid scramjet engine and high temperature capable structures.

Jennifer Huergo | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.onr.navy.mil

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht New method gives microscope a boost in resolution
10.12.2018 | Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum für Experimentelle Biomedizin der Universität Würzburg

nachricht A new 'spin' on kagome lattices
10.12.2018 | Boston College

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>