Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New insights into open string theory

24.06.2002


Theoretical physicist Lennaert Huiszoon has described a new family of strings in research conducted at the National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics. He investigated so-called open strings which can describe elementary particles with a strong interaction.



With string theory, physicists are trying to construct a unifying theory for gravity and quantum mechanics. The theory describes extremely heavy and very small objects such as the universe shortly after the Big Bang or black holes. According to string theory our universe has ten dimensions: three spatial dimensions, one time dimension and six dimensions which are possibly rolled up into thin cylinders.

One of the problems of string theory is that five different versions of it exist! Four of these are theories with closed strings, which can be visualised with elastic bands that move in space-time. The fifth theory has open strings, which can be visualised with elastic bands cut open. In string theory the physics is limited to the splitting and joining of strings. This is the interaction between elementary particles. The greater the number of branches, the stronger the interaction between the particles. To make the calculations feasible, string theorists only examine weak interactions, in other words strings with few branches.


Since 1994 it has been known that one of the closed string theories with strong interactions is exactly the same as the open string theory with weak interactions. By investigating the open string theory, the strong interaction can be described without endlessly complicated calculations. A lot of research concentrates on linking the various string theories. It is thought that they are all special variations of the same theory.

The research into the open strings particularly concentrates on the spaces in which the edges of the strings (the start and endpoint of the cut open elastic band) can move. Lennaert Huiszoon carried out mathematical research into these edge spaces. The spaces are called D-branes after the mathematician Dirichlet.

The physicist suspects that our universe is a four-dimensional D-brane. To prove this a D-brane must be found which has all the properties of the universe: the relatively flat structure of the four- dimensional space time and all elementary particles, with the correct charge, spin and mass.

The physicist Huiszoon limited himself to strings in simple symmetrical spaces, so called group spaces. In the flat surface a circle is a group space and in three dimensions a sphere is a group space. In higher dimensions these group spaces become more complex. Using a new mathematical method he demonstrated that in these group spaces, the ends of the strings can only move in very specific lines or surfaces. In subsequent research the physicist hopes to find D-branes that can actually describe the universe.

Michel Philippens | EurekAlert!

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Quantum gas turns supersolid
23.04.2019 | Universität Innsbruck

nachricht Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun
18.04.2019 | University of Warwick

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Energy-saving new LED phosphor

The human eye is particularly sensitive to green, but less sensitive to blue and red. Chemists led by Hubert Huppertz at the University of Innsbruck have now developed a new red phosphor whose light is well perceived by the eye. This increases the light yield of white LEDs by around one sixth, which can significantly improve the energy efficiency of lighting systems.

Light emitting diodes or LEDs are only able to produce light of a certain colour. However, white light can be created using different colour mixing processes.

Im Focus: Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

Supersolidity is a paradoxical state where the matter is both crystallized and superfluid. Predicted 50 years ago, such a counter-intuitive phase, featuring...

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Proteins stand up to nerve cell regression

24.04.2019 | Life Sciences

New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

24.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

24.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>