Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Optical vacuum cleaner can manipulate nanoparticles

11.09.2019

The TPU and international researchers developed a concept for constructing an optical vacuum cleaner; due to its optical properties, it can trap nanoparticles from the environment; currently, there are no sufficiently effective and widely used devices

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with Russian and international colleagues developed the concept for constructing an "optical vacuum cleaner". Due to its optical properties, it can trap nanoparticles from the environment.


(a) Schematic diagram for the “optical vacuum cleaner”, where a nanoparticle is pulled by the optical force, and moves towards the nanohole structured dielectric cuboid. (b,c) Light intensity (|E|2) and optical force distributions for (b) solid cuboid without a hole, (c) cuboid with a 20 nm hole. The refractive index and size of the simulated cuboids are set to be n = 2 and L = λ. (d) Optical force and light intensity vs illumination wavelength, at the opening of the nanohole. The optical force is assumed to be exerted on a gold nanosphere with the radius of d = 15 nm and complex dielectric permittivity εp = −9.421 + 1.504 i at λ = 600 nm35, and calculated using the dipole approximation. The arrows in blue color represent the optical gradient force.

Credit: Tomsk Polytechnic University

Currently, there are no effective devices for this task. The research results were published in Scientific Reports (IF:4,525; Q1). In the future, such "vacuum cleaners" can be utilized for air purification during lab-on-a-chip operations and preparation of clean rooms.

"The size of nanoparticles varies from 1 to a maximum of 100 nanometers. Currently, researchers from all around the world are seeking for the ways to control such small particles and manipulate them for various applications. However, there have been no sufficiently effective and widely used devices for such tasks yet. We offer a new concept for particle manipulation and capture - it is "optical vacuum cleaner" - says Oleg Minin, Professor of the TPU Division for Electronic Engineering.

According to this concept, an "optical vacuum cleaner" is a dielectric microparticle. In the published article, the scientists used particles having the shape of an equilateral cuboid. The particles have a nanoscale gouge or nanohole. When they are exposed to optical radiation, such as laser, there is optical pressure.

"The resultant force is directed inside our cuboid, trapping nanoparticles into the hole. The ?apacity, respectively, depends on the size of the hole", - says the scientist.

This concept can be implemented in the so-called lab-on-a-chip work in biomedical research. This technique can combine several laboratory functions on a chip, varying in size from a few square millimeters to square centimeters. This advanced on-chip analysis method will allow achieving high-throughput screening and automation. Cleaning chip surface and ambient air from foreign nanoparticles will allow increasing the analyzes sensitivity and the result accuracy.

The study was conduct by Russian and international specialists from Jilin University (China) and Ben-Gurion University (Israel). The next stage will be experimental confirmation of the concept.

Media Contact

Vitalii Sdelnikov
Sdelnikov@tpu.ru
7-382-260-6404

 @TPUnews_en

http://www.tpu.ru/en 

Vitalii Sdelnikov | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://news.tpu.ru/en/news/2019/09/10/35225/
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-49277-9

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Graphene sets the stage for the next generation of THz astronomy detectors
11.09.2019 | Chalmers University of Technology

nachricht New breakthrough: Photomultiplication type all-polymer photodetectors with single carrier transport
10.09.2019 | Science China Press

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Graphene sets the stage for the next generation of THz astronomy detectors

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated a detector made from graphene that could revolutionize the sensors used in next-generation space telescopes. The findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Astronomy.

Beyond superconductors, there are few materials that can fulfill the requirements needed for making ultra-sensitive and fast terahertz (THz) detectors for...

Im Focus: Physicists from Stuttgart prove the existence of a supersolid state of matte

A supersolid is a state of matter that can be described in simplified terms as being solid and liquid at the same time. In recent years, extensive efforts have been devoted to the detection of this exotic quantum matter. A research team led by Tilman Pfau and Tim Langen at the 5th Institute of Physics of the University of Stuttgart has succeeded in proving experimentally that the long-sought supersolid state of matter exists. The researchers report their results in Nature magazine.

In our everyday lives, we are familiar with matter existing in three different states: solid, liquid, or gas. However, if matter is cooled down to extremely...

Im Focus: World record for tandem perovskite-CIGS solar cell

A team headed by Prof. Steve Albrecht from the HZB will present a new world-record tandem solar cell at EU PVSEC, the world's largest international photovoltaic and solar energy conference and exhibition, in Marseille, France on September 11, 2019. This tandem solar cell combines the semiconducting materials perovskite and CIGS and achieves a certified efficiency of 23.26 per cent. One reason for this success lies in the cell’s intermediate layer of organic molecules: they self-organise to cover even rough semiconductor surfaces. Two patents have been filed for these layers.

Perovskite-based solar cells have experienced an incredibly rapid increase in efficiency over the last ten years. The combination of perovskites with classical...

Im Focus: A molecular 'atlas' of animal development

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania provide a molecular map of every cell in a developing animal embryo

In a paper in Science this week, Penn researchers report the first detailed molecular characterization of how every cell changes during animal embryonic...

Im Focus: Next generation video: WDR and Fraunhofer HHI present significantly improved video quality at IFA 2019

The demand for even higher resolution videos will continue to increase in the coming years. For this reason, the German public service broadcaster WDR and the Fraunhofer Heinrich Hertz Institute HHI will collaborate in the coming months to test the Video Coding possibilities offered by the next international standard VVC/H.266.

VVC/H.266 is the successor standard to HEVC/H.265. The latter is currently the most modern and efficient standard for Video Coding and is used, for example, in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

AI for Laser Technology Conference: optimizing the use of lasers with artificial intelligence

29.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Existing drug could treat aggressive brain cancer

11.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Breeders release new flaxseed cultivar with higher yield

11.09.2019 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

How long does a whale feed? New data gives insight into blue and fin whale behavior

11.09.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>