Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Leibniz Institut of Photonic Technology manages European research project for new fiber lasers

29.03.2019

They are intended to enable technologies whose application potential cannot even be estimated yet: A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena is managing a european research project to develop fiber lasers with new wavelengths. The powerful, robust fiber lasers aim at significantly extending the spectral range achieved to date and thus making new applications in medicine and telecommunications possible.

The European Union is supporting the project, in which research institutions from Spain, Poland and Great Britain cooperate, as part of the "FET Open" programme with the aim of promoting ideas for radically new future technologies. Over the next four years it will provide almost 3 million euros for this purpose, 900,000 euros of which for the Leibniz IPHT.


Matthias Jaeger manages the European research project for novel fiber lasers at Leibniz IPHT.

Sven Döring/ Leibniz IPHT

"We are very pleased that we are the only consortium coordinated by a German institute to have been selected for this prestigious and highly competitive program," says Dr. Matthias Jaeger from Leibniz IPHT, head of the "NCLas" ("Nanocrystals in Fiber Lasers") project. By incorporating nanocrystals into a fiber, the scientists want to open up areas that are relevant for biomedical applications but for which there are no practical solutions available yet.

For example, one planned fiber laser targets a spectral range in which tissue is very transparent so that even deep layers become visible. Another fiber laser is of great interest for telecommunications, where information is transmitted via the optical fiber. "The more wavelengths the laser addresses, the more channels are available," explains Matthias Jaeger. "In addition, our research can pave the way for applications for optical fibers that are still a vision of the future today.

There is also great commercial interest in researching new fiber lasers. "They are currently the most successful laser concept," says Jaeger, who heads the "Active Fiber Modules" working group at Leibniz IPHT. The reasons: They have a very good beam quality even at very high powers, but cause lower costs and less maintenance than solid-state lasers.

They also enable compact, robust and energy-efficient light sources. With the Jena-based company Lasos Laser technology "NCLas" is already with economical partners. The European research partners of the project are the Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems Dresden, the University of Cantabria in Santander, Spain, the Wissenschaftlich-Technische AGH-Universität Krakau and the University of Surrey in Guildford, England.

With the "FET Open" ("Future and Emerging Technologies") programme, the EU is promoting unconventional new research ideas at an early stage that aim at fundamental breakthroughs for new technologies. The objective is to question existing paradigms and enable research at the frontier of knowledge. 375 research institutions submitted projects, 38 of which were selected.

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.leibniz-ipht.de/en/institute/presse/news/detail/for-new-possibilitie...

Lavinia Meier-Ewert | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht The magic wavelength of cadmium
16.09.2019 | University of Tokyo

nachricht Tomorrow´s coolants of choice
16.09.2019 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Happy hour for time-resolved crystallography

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Hamburg and the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) outstation in the city have developed a new method to watch biomolecules at work. This method dramatically simplifies starting enzymatic reactions by mixing a cocktail of small amounts of liquids with protein crystals. Determination of the protein structures at different times after mixing can be assembled into a time-lapse sequence that shows the molecular foundations of biology.

The functions of biomolecules are determined by their motions and structural changes. Yet it is a formidable challenge to understand these dynamic motions.

Im Focus: Modular OLED light strips

At the International Symposium on Automotive Lighting 2019 (ISAL) in Darmstadt from September 23 to 25, 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, a provider of research and development services in the field of organic electronics, will present OLED light strips of any length with additional functionalities for the first time at booth no. 37.

Almost everyone is familiar with light strips for interior design. LED strips are available by the metre in DIY stores around the corner and are just as often...

Im Focus: Tomorrow´s coolants of choice

Scientists assess the potential of magnetic-cooling materials

Later during this century, around 2060, a paradigm shift in global energy consumption is expected: we will spend more energy for cooling than for heating....

Im Focus: The working of a molecular string phone

Researchers from the Department of Atomically Resolved Dynamics of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg, the University of Potsdam (both in Germany) and the University of Toronto (Canada) have pieced together a detailed time-lapse movie revealing all the major steps during the catalytic cycle of an enzyme. Surprisingly, the communication between the protein units is accomplished via a water-network akin to a string telephone. This communication is aligned with a ‘breathing’ motion, that is the expansion and contraction of the protein.

This time-lapse sequence of structures reveals dynamic motions as a fundamental element in the molecular foundations of biology.

Im Focus: Milestones on the Way to the Nuclear Clock

Two research teams have succeeded simultaneously in measuring the long-sought Thorium nuclear transition, which enables extremely precise nuclear clocks. TU Wien (Vienna) is part of both teams.

If you want to build the most accurate clock in the world, you need something that "ticks" very fast and extremely precise. In an atomic clock, electrons are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Society 5.0: putting humans at the heart of digitalisation

10.09.2019 | Event News

Interspeech 2019 conference: Alexa and Siri in Graz

04.09.2019 | Event News

AI for Laser Technology Conference: optimizing the use of lasers with artificial intelligence

29.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Novel mechanism of electron scattering in graphene-like 2D materials

17.09.2019 | Materials Sciences

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy

17.09.2019 | Health and Medicine

Fungicides as an underestimated hazard for freshwater organisms

17.09.2019 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>