Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Kiel University is going to fly behind the moon

14.04.2016

The tension was immense, but it was released this week, when the announcement came that one of Kiel University's instruments would be on board the next Chinese mission to the moon, Chang'E 4.

"Kiel University is going to fly behind the moon!" said Jia Yu excitedly, a doctoral candidate at the Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics. Born in China, he will obtain his doctoral degree at Kiel University in a few months and then take over the project "Lunar Lander Neutron Dosimetry“ (LND).


NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) on board the NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite took this unique picture of the back of the moon in July 2015.

Credit: NASA / DSCOVR by Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC)

"We weren't sure if we would be able to implement a project like this one from Kiel with our colleagues at the National Space Science Center in Beijing", Yu reported. For this reason all those involved are even happier that it worked out.

Now that the decision has been made, the team, led by Professor Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, faces a major task. Within one year, the physicists in Kiel want to develop, build and mount the new LND experiment on the spaceship. In the final quarter of 2018, this should then fly to the moon. "A real challenge", said Lars Seimetz and Björn Schuster, the responsible mechanical and electronics engineers, "but really exciting. We can improve our designs that we developed for previous space missions."

Radiation measuring instruments from Kiel have been used before in space missions by the American and European space agencies NASA and ESA: On board the Mars Rover "Curiosity", the team is currently collecting data on galactic and solar particle radiation and using it to research the potential radiation exposure for manned missions to Mars.

The Kiel-based researchers provided four sensors for the "Solar Orbiter" space probe, which will also depart for space at the end of 2018 to research the sun. These sensors are to measure the spread and acceleration of solar particles. Successful experiments such as this one enabled the physicists to collect valuable experience which will be very useful when developing the LND.

The fourth Chinese mission to the moon aims to land on the side of the moon facing away from the Earth. The scientific data from the Lander and the Rover, which will then accommodate further experiments by international research teams, should then be sent to Earth via a relay satellite.

The Kiel-based experiment will measure radiation on the moon in preparation for future manned missions to the moon and - if all goes well - also measure the water content of the ground beneath the landing unit.

"To do this, we will be using a new technology developed for space to provide evidence of so-called thermal neutrons", said Wimmer-Schweingruber. The physicist is convinced that everything will be ready on time, because the group is just right: "It is incredible to be working with such a great team!" This mission also continues a long-term cooperation with the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center (DLR).


Contact:
Prof. Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber
Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics
E-Mail: wimmer@physik.uni-kiel.de
Tel.: +49 (0)173/9513332

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.uni-kiel.de/pressemeldungen/index.php?pmid=2016-106-mondmission&l...

Dr. Boris Pawlowski | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Non-volatile control of magnetic anisotropy through change of electric polarization
12.11.2019 | Kanazawa University

nachricht Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover new high-temperature superconductor
11.11.2019 | Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A new quantum data classification protocol brings us nearer to a future 'quantum internet'

The algorithm represents a first step in the automated learning of quantum information networks

Quantum-based communication and computation technologies promise unprecedented applications, such as unconditionally secure communications, ultra-precise...

Im Focus: Distorted Atoms

In two experiments performed at the free-electron laser FLASH in Hamburg a cooperation led by physicists from the Heidelberg Max Planck Institute for Nuclear physics (MPIK) demonstrated strongly-driven nonlinear interaction of ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) laser pulses with atoms and ions. The powerful excitation of an electron pair in helium was found to compete with the ultrafast decay, which temporarily may even lead to population inversion. Resonant transitions in doubly charged neon ions were shifted in energy, and observed by XUV-XUV pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy.

An international team led by physicists from the MPIK reports on new results for efficient two-electron excitations in helium driven by strong and ultrashort...

Im Focus: A Memory Effect at Single-Atom Level

An international research group has observed new quantum properties on an artificial giant atom and has now published its results in the high-ranking journal Nature Physics. The quantum system under investigation apparently has a memory - a new finding that could be used to build a quantum computer.

The research group, consisting of German, Swedish and Indian scientists, has investigated an artificial quantum system and found new properties.

Im Focus: Shedding new light on the charging of lithium-ion batteries

Exposing cathodes to light decreases charge time by a factor of two in lithium-ion batteries.

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have reported a new mechanism to speed up the charging of lithium-ion...

Im Focus: Visible light and nanoparticle catalysts produce desirable bioactive molecules

Simple photochemical method takes advantage of quantum mechanics

Northwestern University chemists have used visible light and extremely tiny nanoparticles to quickly and simply make molecules that are of the same class as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

High entropy alloys for hot turbines and tireless metal-forming presses

05.11.2019 | Event News

Smart lasers open up new applications and are the “tool of choice” in digitalization

30.10.2019 | Event News

International Symposium on Functional Materials for Electrolysis, Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

02.10.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

How the Zika virus can spread

11.11.2019 | Life Sciences

Researchers find new potential approach to type 2 diabetes treatment

11.11.2019 | Health and Medicine

Medica 2019: Arteriosclerosis - new technologies help to find proper catheters and location of vasoconstriction

11.11.2019 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>