Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hot, dense material surrounds O-type star with largest magnetic field known

23.09.2015

Findings have implications on evolution of massive stars

Observations using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory revealed that the unusually large magnetosphere around an O-type star called NGC 1624-2 contains a raging storm of extreme stellar winds and dense plasma that gobbles up X-rays before they can escape into space.


The magnetic field of the O-type star called NGC 1624-2 is unusually large for its class.

Credit: SOHO/[instrument] Consortium. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Findings from a team of researchers led by Florida Institute of Technology Assistant Professor Véronique Petit may help scientists better understand the lifecycle of certain massive stars, which are essential for creating metals needed for the formation of other stars and planets.

The findings will be published Sept. 23 in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society from Oxford University Press.

The massive O-type star - the hottest and brightest type of star in the universe - has the largest magnetosphere known in its class. Petit found NGC 1624-2's magnetic field traps gas trying to escape from the star and those gases absorb their own X-rays. The star's powerful stellar winds are three to five times faster and at least 100,000 times denser than our Sun's solar wind. Those winds grapple violently with the magnetic field and the trapped particles create the star's huge aura of hot, very dense plasma.

"The magnetic field isn't letting its stellar wind get away from the star, so you get these big flows that are forced to collide head on at the magnetic equator, creating gas shock-heated to 10 million Kelvin and plenty of X-rays," said Petit, who was part of a team of scientists that discovered the star in 2012. "But the magnetosphere is so large that nearly 80 percent of these X-rays get absorbed before being able to escape into free space and reach the Chandra telescope."

The magnetic field at the surface of NGC 1624-2 is 20,000 times stronger than at the surface of our Sun. If NGC 1624-2 was in the center of our solar system, loops of dense, hot plasma would extend nearly to the orbit of Venus.

Only one in 10 massive stars have a magnetic field. Unlike smaller stars like our sun that generate magnetism with an internal dynamo, magnetic fields in massive stars are "fossils" left over from some event in its early life, perhaps from a collision with another star.

Petit and her team, including Florida Tech graduate student Rebecca MacInnis, will know even more about the NGC 1624-2 in October after getting data back from the Hubble Space Telescope that will explore the dynamics of its trapped wind.

###

Other scientists who contributed to the research were: David Cohen, Swarthmore College; Gregg Wade, Royal Military College of Canada; Yael Nazé, L'Université de Liège; Stanley Owocki, University of Delaware; Jon Sundqvist, University of Delaware; Asif ud-Doula, Penn State Worthington Scranton; Alex Fullerton, Space Telescope Science Institute; Maurice Leutenegger, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and University of Maryland; Marc Gagné, West Chester University.

The paper will be available at midnight Sept. 23 here: http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/lookup/doi/10.1093/mnras/stv1741

Media Contact

Adam Lowenstein
adam@fit.edu
321-674-8964

http://www.fit.edu 

Adam Lowenstein | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: Delaware NGC Space Telescope Telescope X-rays dense escape magnetic field magnetosphere massive stars material

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators
14.12.2018 | DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

nachricht In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet
14.12.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

14.12.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>