Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Building granular towers drop by drop and how to see out from under an invisibility cloak

28.10.2011
An unprecedented variety of smooth symmetric, corrugated, zig-zag shaped slender structures can be observed by simply dripping a mixture of sand and water on a liquid absorbing surface such as a dry bed of sand or blotting paper.

The various shapes are in contrast with the liquid drops which can splash, spread or bounce upon hitting a surface. Successive drops freeze rapidly upon impact due to the drainage of a small fraction of liquid, literally stacking on top of each other into surprisingly slender structures know as granular towers.


Dripping a mixture of sand and water onto an absorbent surface can lead to striking structures of a wide variety of striking forms. Credit: Image courtesy of Julien Chopin and Arshad Kudrolli

In addition, twisted pagoda dome-like structures result upon increasing the flow rate of the damp granular mixture. Experiments show that the towers are held together because of capillary and friction forces, and the shape of the towers depends on a subtle balance between dripping frequency, density of grains, and impact speed. Besides applications in surface patterning, this tower building technique may be a new and easy way to probe the flow properties of dense granular suspensions by observing the shapes of the towers they produce.

Peering Out from Under an Invisibility Cloak
Jin-Zhu Zhao, De-Lin Wang, Ru-Wen Peng, Qing Hu, and Mu Wang National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Physical Review E 84, 046607 (2011)

Most invisibility cloak designs have one serious drawback - they make it impossible for anyone hiding under the cloak to see what's going on in the outside world. Researchers have now come up with an approach that, in theory, should allow us to make cloaks that allow you to peek out while remaining entirely hidden. In effect, they propose making a tiny tear in the cloak, and then stitching the hole with a two types of materials chosen to effectively cancel each other out when seen from the outside, while still allowing light to enter. Although the cloak design currently exists only on paper, it theoretically ensures that aspiring Harry Potters remain entirely undetectable while keeping an eye on the Voldemorts and Snapes all around them.

James Riordon | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aps.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion
16.11.2018 | University of New Hampshire

nachricht NASA keeps watch over space explosions
16.11.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>