Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Always on beat: ultrashort flashes of light under optical control

16.10.2019

Ultrashort laser pulses have enabled scientists and physicians to carry out high-precision material analyses and medical procedures. Physicists from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Göttingen have now discovered a new method for adjusting the extremely short time intervals between laser flashes with exceptional speed and precision. The intervals can be increased or decreased as needed, all at the push of a button. Potential applications range from laser spectroscopy to microscopy and materials processing. The researchers have now presented their latest findings in the journal Nature Photonics.

Laser pulses have long been utilized in research laboratories, industrial production, and medical therapies. In these applications it is often crucial that the pulses – also known as optical solitons – occur at certain intervals.


Light pulses can form pairs in ultra-short pulse lasers. The pulse intervals (red) can be precisely adjusted by making certain changes to pump beam (green).

Image: UBT

Using a special high-speed measurement technique, the researchers have now been able to show how a short-pulse laser widely applied in research can be made to automatically generate pairs of light pulses separated by the desired interval.

All that is required are small disturbances in the green optical "pump beam” (which generates the laser pulses) triggered by electric signals.

The new process centres on the targeted manipulation of solitons, wave packets that can occur in pairs in ultrashort laser pulses. "The resonance excitation and the short disturbance of soliton pairs trigger effects that can be used to specifically control ultrashort laser pulses.

This opens up an exciting new area of research with a yet unforeseeable range of possible applications," said Prof. Dr. Georg Herink from Bayreuth, corresponding author of the new study. "At the right frequency, a tiny external modulation of the laser is all you need, and ultrashort laser pulses are set into reciprocal, resonant oscillation.

Similar phenomena can be observed in water molecules heated in the microwave," added lead author Felix Kurtz from Göttingen.

The newly published findings show that in the future, ultra-short pulse lasers will not only be considered as a tool, but also remain a fascinating object of research.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Prof. Dr. Georg Herink
Experimental Physics VIII
University of Bayreuth
Phone: +49 (0)921 / 55-3161
E-mail: georg.herink@uni-bayreuth.de

Originalpublikation:

F. Kurtz, C. Ropers, G. Herink: Resonant excitation and all-optical switching of femtosecond soliton molecules. Nature Photonics (2019), DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41566-019-0530-3

Christian Wißler | Universität Bayreuth
Further information:
http://www.uni-bayreuth.de/

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Doubts about basic assumption for the universe
08.04.2020 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Something is Lurking in the Heart of Quasar 3C 279
08.04.2020 | Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The human body as an electrical conductor, a new method of wireless power transfer

Published by Marc Tudela, Laura Becerra-Fajardo, Aracelys García-Moreno, Jesus Minguillon and Antoni Ivorra, in Access, the journal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

The project Electronic AXONs: wireless microstimulators based on electronic rectification of epidermically applied currents (eAXON, 2017-2022), funded by a...

Im Focus: Belle II yields the first results: In search of the Z′ boson

The Belle II experiment has been collecting data from physical measurements for about one year. After several years of rebuilding work, both the SuperKEKB electron–positron accelerator and the Belle II detector have been improved compared with their predecessors in order to achieve a 40-fold higher data rate.

Scientists at 12 institutes in Germany are involved in constructing and operating the detector, developing evaluation algorithms, and analyzing the data.

Im Focus: When ions rattle their cage

Electrolytes play a key role in many areas: They are crucial for the storage of energy in our body as well as in batteries. In order to release energy, ions - charged atoms - must move in a liquid such as water. Until now the precise mechanism by which they move through the atoms and molecules of the electrolyte has, however, remained largely unknown. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have now shown that the electrical resistance of an electrolyte, which is determined by the motion of ions, can be traced back to microscopic vibrations of these dissolved ions.

In chemistry, common table salt is also known as sodium chloride. If this salt is dissolved in water, sodium and chloride atoms dissolve as positively or...

Im Focus: Harnessing the rain for hydrovoltaics

Drops of water falling on or sliding over surfaces may leave behind traces of electrical charge, causing the drops to charge themselves. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz have now begun a detailed investigation into this phenomenon that accompanies us in every-day life. They developed a method to quantify the charge generation and additionally created a theoretical model to aid understanding. According to the scientists, the observed effect could be a source of generated power and an important building block for understanding frictional electricity.

Water drops sliding over non-conducting surfaces can be found everywhere in our lives: From the dripping of a coffee machine, to a rinse in the shower, to an...

Im Focus: A sensational discovery: Traces of rainforests in West Antarctica

90 million-year-old forest soil provides unexpected evidence for exceptionally warm climate near the South Pole in the Cretaceous

An international team of researchers led by geoscientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

13th AKL – International Laser Technology Congress: May 4–6, 2022 in Aachen – Laser Technology Live already this year!

02.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Doubts about basic assumption for the universe

08.04.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Accelerating AI Together – DFKI Welcomes NVIDIA as Newest Shareholder

08.04.2020 | Information Technology

Ear’s inner secrets revealed with new technology

08.04.2020 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>