Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Leap Into Quantum Technology

09.11.2018

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve these objectives: quantum states are used to transport information, which eliminates unauthorized copying or reading due to fundamental physical laws.


Micropillars with quantum dots are to help make data communication secure. They are developed at the University of Würzburg.

(Picture: Tobias Huber)

To support the leap into quantum technology, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) funds the new joint project titled "Quanten-Link-Erweiterung" (English: quantum link extension, short Q.Link.X) with 14.8 million euro over the next three years.

"Our goal is to develop physically secure networks based on optical fiber", says Professor Dieter Meschede who works at the Institute of Applied Physics in Bonn, which makes the official statements on behalf of the joint project.

Quantum communication is still limited

However, this paradigm shift in data and message encryption – away from algorithmic processes to quantum technology – is limited:

When transferring quantum information in fiber with light particles (photons), transmission losses occur inevitably. As a result, transmission links are presently limited to less than 100 kilometers.

"We intend to use quantum repeaters to overcome this barrier without compromising security," says Dieter Meschede. In telecommunication, a repeater is an electronic device that processes or amplifies a signal.

It receives a signal, processes and retransmits it to extend the signal range and bridge a longer distance. The BMBF funded project aims to drive the development of such quantum repeaters.

Aim is a complete communication link

Three different platforms are used for this purpose: quantum dots, diamond color centers and a combination of atomic and ionic systems. They will be used to implement transmission links of initially up to ten or 100 kilometers and compare the advantages of the respective systems with each other.

"For the first time, Q.Link.X studies and develops not just individual components of a quantum repeater, but complete communication links," Meschede says.

These activities are set to prepare a technology that might be suitable to cover longer distances of several hundred to thousand kilometers using optical fiber, at a later stage.

University of Würzburg: quantum dots in micropillars

Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, receives more than 1.2 million euro funding from the joint project. On the Hubland Campus, Professor Sven Höfling and his team at the Chair for Applied Physics are working to build a quantum repeater segment based on semiconductor quantum dots in micropillars. The JMU team designs and builds the micropillars and inserts them into the communication link.

Quantum information from a photon is stored in the quantum dots of the micropillars, subsequently read and coded back into a photon. "The interference of two photons from two remote quantum dots allows generating an entangled quantum state that exists simultaneously in both remote quantum dots," says Dr. Tobias Huber, a JMU physicist. Subsequently, this state can be read out again at both quantum dots. In a network, it should be possible to extend this state sequentially from repeater to repeater, to cover any distance.

24 partners contribute to Q.Link.X

The involvement of industry partners and consultants from the beginning of the project facilitates the viability from an industrial an engineering point of view. The results are to be exploited in Germany through patents and spin-offs of the consortium. Q.Link.X has brought together 24 partners from university research institutes and industrial labs to study the key technology of quantum repeaters.

Wissenschaftliche Ansprechpartner:

Dr. Tobias Huber, Chair for Applied Physics, University of Würzburg, T +49 931 31-84117, tobias.huber@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de

Prof. Dr. Sven Höfling, Chair for Applied Physics, University of Würzburg, +4993131-83613, sven.hoefling@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.forschung-it-sicherheit-kommunikationssysteme.de/projekte/q-link.x Project website

Robert Emmerich | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators
14.12.2018 | DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

nachricht In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet
14.12.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

14.12.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tangled magnetic fields power cosmic particle accelerators

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

In search of missing worlds, Hubble finds a fast evaporating exoplanet

14.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>