Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New urine test detects common cause of kidney transplant failure

23.01.2009
Noninvasive screen could improve diagnosis and care of patients with polyomavirus nephropathy

A new and simple urine test can detect polyomavirus nephropathy, a relatively new and serious complication that affects up to 9% of kidney transplant recipients, according to a study appearing in the February 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The advance could lead to better diagnosis and treatment of patients with this condition.

While polyomaviruses are normally occurring viruses that harmlessly infect many adults, they can pose serious health problems for individuals who become immunocompromised. Such is the case for many kidney transplant recipients who must take immunosuppressive medications to safeguard against organ rejection. Some of these patients develop a damaging condition called polyomavirus nephropathy that can lead to chronic kidney failure and the need to re-initiate dialysis or undergo another transplant.

Because there are no effective therapies to treat polyomavirus nephropathy, it is important to diagnose the condition as early as possible, before it becomes serious. Therapy normally consists of lowering the dose of immunosuppressive drugs and hoping for natural viral clearance.

Unfortunately, there currently is no definitive way to accurately diagnose polyomavirus nephropathy. Physicians rely mostly on invasive and expensive kidney biopsies, which sometimes give false negative results. But now Volker Nickeleit, MD, of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and his colleagues have discovered a new and noninvasive way to test for the condition. The test measures "Haufen"—a German term meaning stack or pile—in the urine. Haufen are tightly clustered viral aggregates that form within the kidneys in patients with polyomavirus nephropathy and are excreted in the urine. Testing for Haufen is fast (three hours), inexpensive (less than $400), and easy to perform with current laboratory equipment.

Through their investigation, the researchers found Haufen in urine samples from all 21 patients with early or late stages of polyomavirus nephropathy, but not in any of the 139 individuals without the condition.

According to Dr. Nickeleit, the new test could help physicians identify and monitor patients with polyomavirus nephropathy and could guide them as they design new therapeutic strategies. "An early and accurate diagnosis of polyomavirus nephropathy will result in a better understanding of the disease and ultimately improve treatment," he said. "Our diagnostic test is unique and could have a tremendous clinical impact," he added.

While their findings look promising, the authors stress that additional studies—particularly large prospective clinical trials—are needed to verify the test's potential before it can become available for widespread use in patients with suspected polyomavirus nephropathy.

The article, entitled "A New Urinary Biomarker to Accurately Predict Polyomavirus Nephropathy," will appear online at http://jasn.asnjournals.org/ on January 21, 2009, and in the February 2009 print issue of JASN.

Shari Leventhal | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.asn-online.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Air pollution leads to cardiovascular diseases

21.08.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Researchers target protein that protects bacteria's DNA 'recipes'

21.08.2018 | Life Sciences

A paper battery powered by bacteria

21.08.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>