Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New research network for Multiple Sclerosis research spearheaded by Mainz University Medical Center

15.01.2013
European Commission to contribute approximately EUR 3.5 million for network development

To date, Multiple Sclerosis (MS) has been considered to be an incurable disease involving the immune system and its exact causes are still unknown. Why exactly is there inadequate communication between the various kinds of immune cells in patients with the autoimmune disease MS? Why are the brains of MS patients the targets of "accidental" attacks by their own immune system?

It is hoped that the research network ITN-NeuroKine, currently in the process of being formed under the aegis of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) with the help of EUR 3.5 million in funding provided by the European Commission, will provide answers to these questions. ITN stands for Initial Training Network, a concept established as one of the Marie Curie Actions and designed to promote European networks for the structured training of young researchers. 'NeuroKine' is an acronym for 'Neurological disorders orchestrated by cytoKines'. The ITN NeuroKine network was launched on January 1, 2013.

"The core objective of our new ITN-NeuroKine research network is to gain insight into the impairment of communication between immune cells," explained Professor Dr. Ari Waisman, Director of the Institute of Molecular Medicine (IMM) at the Mainz University Medical Center. "We will specifically be focusing on the soluble proteins called cytokines, which regulate the communication between these cells." Immune cells are mobile and are present at various sites in the body.

The ITN-NeuroKine research network is composed of an international team of researchers with a broad range of expertise in the areas of molecular and cellular neuroimmunology and neuropathology. The participants are scientists from the University of Zürich (UZH), the Medical University of Vienna (MUW), the Parisian Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), the Università Vita-Salute San Raffaele (USR) in Milan, the Weizmann Institute of Science (WIS) based in Rehovot, Israel, the Erasmus University Medical Center in Rotterdam (EMC), and the Charité University Hospital in Berlin together with various commercial medical organizations, such as Miltenyi Biotech GmbH, Apitope Technology Ltd., Phenex Pharmaceuticals AG, and the Mainz-based BioNTech AG. Also participating are the Postdoc Career Development Initiative (PCDI) in Utrecht, the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Basel, and GlaxoSmithKline.

"The creation of the ITN-NeuroKine research network is crucial to the reputation of Mainz as a science hub. On the one hand, the ITN-NeuroKine network will be conducting cutting-edge research into the area where brain and immune system interact. At the same time, this network will be providing young researchers with the opportunity to receive specialized training," emphasized Professor Dr. Dr. Reinhard Urban, Chief Scientific Officer of the Mainz University Medical Center.

Petra Giegerich | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-mainz.de/presse/16087_ENG_HTML.php
http://www.unimedizin-mainz.de/index.php?id=17623

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness
11.07.2018 | McGill University

nachricht Direct conversion of non-neuronal cells into nerve cells
03.07.2018 | Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pollen taxi for bacteria

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences

Biological signalling processes in intelligent materials

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

18.07.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>