Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Future of Radiotherapy in the UK

07.12.2007
The University of Surrey welcomes the Government’s announcement today (3 December) that improved radiotherapy strategies are going to be at the forefront of government policy in the fight against cancer.

This announcement is extremely timely, but it is extremely sad that the UK currently has no plans for the newest type of radiotherapy which uses charged particles rather than X-rays. This exciting new generation of radiotherapy, which delivers more damage to the tumour and much less to the surrounding healthy tissue, will especially benefit children and tumours that are more difficult to treat with conventional (photon) radiotherapy. A report on particle therapy was submitted to HMG by the National Radiotherapy Advisory Group (NRAG) last year.

There are now over 60 particle therapy facilities in various stages of operation, development and procurement in the USA and the rest of Europe, but none are currently planned for the UK. The UK does have a low energy facility at Clatterbridge which has been spectacularly successful in treating tumours of the surface of the eye but is too low energy to treat more common deeper-seated tumours.

The UK is in an excellent position to take advantage of particle therapy as there are excellent networks both on the clinical side (ACORRN) and between clinicians scientists and engineers (EPSRC Research Network on Biomedical Applications of High Energy Ion Beams). Moreover , the research infrastructure to take this research from bench to bedside is already in place, via the Wolfson Nanobeam Project at the University of Surrey and recent funding through the Research Councils Basic Technology programme (CONFORM and LIBRA) for the next generation of particle therapy machines , which aim to develop the next generation of ion sources for particle therapy.

In 2009 the UK will celebrate Rutherford’s experiments which helped to understand the atom and the role of the proton yet the UK is the only nation in Western Europe without plans to use this discovery, and protons for a charged particle facility.

Stuart Miller | alfa
Further information:
http://www.surrey.ac.uk

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Regensburg physicists watch electron transfer in a single molecule

For the first time, an international team of scientists based in Regensburg, Germany, has recorded the orbitals of single molecules in different charge states in a novel type of microscopy. The research findings are published under the title “Mapping orbital changes upon electron transfer with tunneling microscopy on insulators” in the prestigious journal “Nature”.

The building blocks of matter surrounding us are atoms and molecules. The properties of that matter, however, are often not set by these building blocks...

Im Focus: University of Konstanz gains new insights into the recent development of the human immune system

Scientists at the University of Konstanz identify fierce competition between the human immune system and bacterial pathogens

Cell biologists from the University of Konstanz shed light on a recent evolutionary process in the human immune system and publish their findings in the...

Im Focus: Transformation through Light

Laser physicists have taken snapshots of carbon molecules C₆₀ showing how they transform in intense infrared light

When carbon molecules C₆₀ are exposed to an intense infrared light, they change their ball-like structure to a more elongated version. This has now been...

Im Focus: Famous “sandpile model” shown to move like a traveling sand dune

Researchers at IST Austria find new property of important physical model. Results published in PNAS

The so-called Abelian sandpile model has been studied by scientists for more than 30 years to better understand a physical phenomenon called self-organized...

Im Focus: Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.

DNA is not only a popular research topic because it contains the blueprint for life – it can also be used to produce tiny components for technical applications.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Global Legal Hackathon at HAW Hamburg

11.02.2019 | Event News

The world of quantum chemistry meets in Heidelberg

30.01.2019 | Event News

Our digital society in 2040

16.01.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gravitational waves will settle cosmic conundrum

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Spintronics by 'straintronics'

15.02.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Platinum nanoparticles for selective treatment of liver cancer cells

15.02.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>