Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UK'S World-leading Clinical Imaging Centre opened by GlaxoSmithKline, Imperial College London, Medical Research Council

13.06.2007
GlaxoSmithKline's (GSK) new Clinical Imaging Centre (CIC) was officially opened today by the Right Honourable Alistair Darling MP, Secretary of State for Trade and Industry. The new centre represents an investment of over £50 million and is a pioneering collaboration between industry, academia and public sector.

Commenting on the collaboration and state-of-the-art facility, Mr Darling said: "This new centre is right at the forefront of the fight against some of the major diseases in the world. It means a world leading facility based here in the UK bringing the best of industry and academia together backed by the Government. It will give researchers what they need to enhance our reputation as a world leader in science, research and putting great ideas into practice, speeding up the process to deliver the new medicines that patients need."

GSK's CIC is a unique venture undertaken by GSK, Imperial College London and the Medical Research Council - the largest new imaging centre in Europe dedicated to development and application of imaging techniques for clinical research. The collaboration will combine the expertise and knowledge each partner has developed in the use of imaging technologies and will apply it to the development of new medicines across a broad range of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and psychiatric and neurological disorders. One of the world's largest industry-university-government collaborations, the CIC will create a globally-recognised centre of expertise in West London and substantially increase the entire research base in medical imaging in the UK.

"GSK's investment in this state-of-the-art research facility reflects the positive environment for science and innovation in the UK. The science we conduct here will transform the lives of patients in the UK and around the world. It is important to us, and to the UK, that the environment remains supportive" said Dr Moncef Slaoui, Chairman, GlaxoSmithKline Research & Development. "This facility will allow GSK to partner with Imperial College and the MRC to create a world-class scientific collaboration, utilising the latest advancements in imaging to better understand diseases and how to treat them."

Sir Richard Sykes, Rector of Imperial College London, said, "This centre is a prime example of what can be achieved when universities, government and industry work side by side. It enables us to translate our scientific advances into improving patient care as quickly as possible. By combining the expertise of leaders in imaging technology and giving them access to the very latest equipment, we can advance our understanding of diseases that affect millions of people."

The CIC building, which is adjacent to the Hammersmith Hospital site of Imperial College London, was carefully selected for the new development as it is already home to many of the world's leading experts in imaging technology.

"The CIC is located at the heart of a clinical research centre comprising the MRC's Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College and Hammersmith Hospital and will benefit from the dynamism which prevails there," said Professor Colin Blakemore, Chief Executive of the Medical Research Council. "It has been an eagerly awaited addition to the site, providing substantial additional resources to a group of clinicians and scientists buzzing with ideas on how to make the most of such equipment and facilities both academically and to the benefit of patients. Imaging is allowing us to go further than many of us had imagined possible in understanding how the human body works and is an area which will greatly inform therapeutic interventions and drug development in the years to come."

Modern imaging technology provides a 'window' through which to study in fine detail both disease processes and the action of potential medicines in human organs such as the brain, heart and lungs - disease-associated changes in glucose metabolism, for example, or the affinity of the drug for its target. Its sensitivity allows molecular interactions to be probed.

Backed by a 10 year commitment by GSK to invest £11 million a year in this centre, the CIC will use and advance the latest technologies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Its facilities include an advanced radiochemistry development facility, two MRI machines and two PET scanners which give the unit the capacity to conduct up to 2500 scans annually. Built over 3 floors it will be staffed by almost 80 clinical, scientific and support staff, plus an additional eight Research Fellows from Imperial College.

The whole Burlington Danes centre, which encompasses the GSK CIC, ICL and MRC facilities, will eventually employ around 400 researchers and support staff. Around half of these will be new positions. In addition to the research centre, the completed development will include affordable housing for over 300 health workers, provided by the Charity Trustees for Hammersmith Hospital's partner Thames Valley Housing Association.

Laura Gallagher | alfa
Further information:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk
http://www.mrc.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: It’s All in the Mix: Jülich Researchers are Developing Fast-Charging Solid-State Batteries

There are currently great hopes for solid-state batteries. They contain no liquid parts that could leak or catch fire. For this reason, they do not require cooling and are considered to be much safer, more reliable, and longer lasting than traditional lithium-ion batteries. Jülich scientists have now introduced a new concept that allows currents up to ten times greater during charging and discharging than previously described in the literature. The improvement was achieved by a “clever” choice of materials with a focus on consistently good compatibility. All components were made from phosphate compounds, which are well matched both chemically and mechanically.

The low current is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the development of solid-state batteries. It is the reason why the batteries take a relatively long...

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum bugs, meet your new swatter

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

A novel synthetic antibody enables conditional “protein knockdown” in vertebrates

20.08.2018 | Life Sciences

Metamolds: Molding a mold

20.08.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>