Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Task force recommends greater use of exercise testing in chronic disease

27.02.2007
Exercise testing can be a powerful tool for diagnosing chronic heart and lung conditions and measuring responses to treatment, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal.

The findings come from a three-year international research project by the European Respiratory Society’s (ERS) task force on clinical exercise testing, which has evaluated the technology and its benefits and provided recommendations on its use for clinicians.

Clinical exercise testing measures the functioning of the heart, lungs and muscles during exercise and is very sensitive to changes in performance – important in chronic conditions where improvements can be small and very slow.

Professor of Sports Science at the University of Leeds and member of the ERS task force, Sue Ward said: “We were asked to review the latest developments in this kind of testing and look at the reasons why physicians should be considering it as a diagnostic tool. It does require expensive equipment and trained staff, but our review showed that the benefits for a large number of patients suffering from chronic conditions can be considerable.”

One of the biggest problems for people suffering from chronic heart and lung disease is an intolerance to exercise – often to the point of struggling to get up out of a chair or to walk across a room without getting breathless. This inability to exercise leads to further problems, such as a loss of body mass and muscle wasting, and can mean a lower life expectancy for the patient.

Clinicians usually attempt to tackle this problem through interventions such as exercise training, drug treatments, additional oxygen or dietary changes, but as the improvements in the patient can be quite small the effectiveness of the treatment is very hard to judge. Clinical exercise testing enables small incremental changes to be measured and so interventions can be properly evaluated and applied for each patient.

The task force also found that, because the indices it uses are very sensitive to change, clinical exercise testing can be used to diagnose certain conditions and diseases and can also have a prognostic value.

Clinical exercise testing has been used in North America, Japan, Italy and Germany since the 1970s and 80s, but is still rare in the UK. Cardiovascular disease remains the UK’s biggest killer, and although death rates have been falling rapidly since the 1970s, rates in the UK are still amongst the highest in Western Europe.

The initial findings from the task force are published in the latest issue of the European Respiratory Journal and will be the subject of a European Respiratory Society monograph later in the year.

Vanessa Bridge | alfa
Further information:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First diode for magnetic fields

Innsbruck quantum physicists have constructed a diode for magnetic fields and then tested it in the laboratory. The device, developed by the research groups led by the theorist Oriol Romero-Isart and the experimental physicist Gerhard Kirchmair, could open up a number of new applications.

Electric diodes are essential electronic components that conduct electricity in one direction but prevent conduction in the opposite one. They are found at the...

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water

21.11.2018 | Life Sciences

New China and US studies back use of pulse oximeters for assessing blood pressure

21.11.2018 | Medical Engineering

Exoplanet stepping stones

21.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>