Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Polio outbreak from oral vaccine identified -- and controlled -- in China

17.08.2006
A 2004 outbreak of polio in China traced back to live attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV), which is widely used in global eradication efforts, highlights the small but significant risk to eradication posed by the use of OPV at suboptimal rates of coverage.

The study, reported in the Sept. 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases, and now available online, describes the first outbreak of poliomyelitis in China in more than a decade and the first in that country caused by vaccine-derived virus.

This marks the fifth outbreak of vaccine-derived poliomyelitis reported in the world since 2000, the year in which China was certified free of wild-type poliovirus.

The study was conducted in 2004 by Jingjin Yu, MD, and colleagues in Beijing and elsewhere, involving virus isolated from an outbreak in Guizhou province in rural China. Reported national immunization coverage in China is close to 90 percent, but children in the affected area of Guizhou, the poorest province in China, had much lower rates of immunization at the time of the study: only 72 percent of one- to three-year-olds had received at least three doses of the oral vaccine.

The investigators identified six children (three cases and three contacts) in two small towns who had had acute and residual polio-like paralysis and from whom the same type of vaccine-derived poliovirus (type 1) was isolated. A seventh child with paralysis was negative for type 1 virus, but it was found in a close contact of that child. None of the children had been immunized against polio.

Based on the virus strain's known rates of mutation, the finding indicated that the isolates had been circulating for less than a year. This is in contrast to past experience with vaccine-derived strains, which have tended to persist for several years--suggesting how quickly this strain can revert to a paralytic and transmissible form.

Once the outbreak was identified, a province-wide immunization campaign was mounted targeting all children under age 5, with reported coverage of more than 90 percent. To date, the outbreak strain has not been found in any child with polio-like paralysis in the province or elsewhere in China.

In an accompanying editorial, Walter Dowdle, PhD, of the Task Force for Child Survival and Development and Olen Kew, PhD, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suggest that the China outbreak indicates that vaccine-derived poliovirus can emerge within pockets of lower OPV coverage in countries with overall high levels of immunization and disease surveillance, and that the virus can be contained if identified quickly. They also emphasize the importance of paying close attention to regions that have historically acted as reservoirs of polio, despite the fact that such remote communities as Guizhou were long thought to be unlikely sites for the re-emergence of the virus after eradication because of a lower frequency of exposure.

According to Dowdle and Kew, important questions about the use of oral polio vaccine arise from this outbreak. In 2003, the World Health Organization recommended discontinuing the use of live virus vaccine after the eradication of the disease and containment of poliovirus stocks. But the cost of switching entirely to inactivated polio vaccine would present financial challenges to poor nations, as the cost of the inactivated preparation is estimated at $2.00 to $3.00 per dose, in contrast to 3 cents per dose for the live attenuated oral vaccine. As Yu and colleagues point out, immunization policies will have to be carefully considered in light of both medical and financial concerns.

Steve Baragona | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.idsociety.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Hepatitis: liver failure attributable to compromised blood supply
19.12.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise
14.12.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Artificial intelligence meets materials science

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Gut microbiome regulates the intestinal immune system, researchers find

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>