Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Medical expertise available wherever emergencies occur

28.07.2006
Emergency personnel often lack the trauma expertise necessary to treat victims of severe accidents or other emergencies. Some victims die because they do not reach hospital emergency rooms fast enough. But now a system for remote treatment could help improve survival rates.

The DICOEMS project has developed a wireless technology platform enabling doctors in hospital emergency rooms to remotely manage treatment of accident and other emergency victims. With specially equipped handheld computers or smart phones, paramedics and other emergency personnel first on the scene can send images and critical patient information, including vital data such as pulse, respiration, and ECG, to specialists at hospital emergency departments. Doctors can monitor the patient's condition via streaming video from the ambulance, make a diagnosis and provide detailed medical procedures for paramedics to follow.

"DICOEMS could significantly improve survival rates for victims of accidents or other medical emergencies by reducing the chance of inappropriate treatment," says Matteo Colombo, a technical specialist at Synergia 2000, the Milan-based project coordinator. "The system will improve decision support, diagnosis and risk management in critical situations occurring far from hospital emergency rooms," says Colombo.

With DICOEMS's global positioning system, central emergency systems can check an ambulance's position and tell the driver the fastest, most efficient route to the emergency site, and then from the site to the hospital. Central switchboard operators will have access to a specialised database allowing them to direct ambulances to the hospital best equipped to treat the patient's condition.

The project also sought to improve use of patient data. "We found out that there was a big gap in how medical information from an emergency was stored, so emergency-intervention data was not followed up on properly and not available to other health-care providers. This is especially a problem if the patient has a recurring condition," says Colombo.

DICOEMS employs a Grid network management system to efficiently integrate geographically dispersed and often heterogeneous databases. In an emergency, DICOEMS could allow identification of patients and access to their recent medical history, before the ambulance reaches the hospital. The system's multi-channel environment could also enable a patient's personal physician to remotely participate in his or her treatment.

An important component of the system is a text-search tool for matching patient clinical data with the most appropriate hospital and doctors for his or her problems. "In Monza Emergency Center ([using the free, single emergency telephone number,] 118), we tested this function with a database of cardiovascular terminology. This way, emergency switchboard operators can type in key words describing a cardiological emergency, and the system returns the most suitable hospitals for the patient's condition, also noting their availability," says Colombo.

DICOEMS has conducted two major pilot projects. The main Italian emergency services tested the remote emergency system, and the UK partner, Guy's and St. Thomas Hospital NHS Trust, tested the data integration and transfer capacity. "We hope to arrange an agreement allowing Guy's and St. Thomas Hospital to serve as the bridge between the DICOEMS Italian organisation and the UK's entire NHS system," says Colombo.

The DICOEMS system is scheduled to go into use by Italian ambulance centres by year's end, following approval by local authorities. "In Italy, there is already a strong willingness by ambulance associations to use the new system," says Colombo. "We have also received positive feedback from the European Commission," says Colombo.

The next step is to find partners to exploit the new technology. "In Eastern Europe, since there are no computer-assisted programs like this, DICOEMS could be sold as a whole system. Similar, though less advanced, systems already exist in Western Europe, so these countries could implement modules. DICOEMS is very flexible," concludes Colombo.

Jernett Karensen | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht The genes are not to blame
20.07.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines
20.07.2018 | Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>