Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The “roulette wheel”: a new tool to help patients make difficult treatment decisions

13.06.2006
Researchers at the University of California have developed an innovative new visual tool to help patients decide among different treatment options.

The new tool, described in PLoS Medicine, presents the risks and benefits of these different options in the form of a roulette wheel. The patient spins the wheel, and can then directly visualize the chances of a particular treatment leading to benefit or harm.

The researchers, led by Jerome Hoffman, show how the roulette wheel could help a healthy 65-year old man decide whether or not to be screened for prostate cancer (the screening test is a blood test called the PSA).

By spinning the roulette wheel, the man sees that if he decides to get a PSA test, he may slightly lower his risk of dying from prostate cancer but he also greatly increases the chances of becoming incontinent and/or impotent from prostate cancer treatment. The roulette wheel shows him that his chances of developing symptoms of prostate cancer are very small, whether or not he gets screened.

“Shared decision making has largely been adopted as an ideal way for physicians and patients to join together whenever there are decisions that need to be made about management of health care issues,” say the researchers.

But one of the problems with shared decision making, they say, is that physicians have traditionally presented the risks and benefits of different treatments in the form of numbers, which many people have trouble understanding. “It is hard for anyone to comprehend the difference between a 7% chance and an 8% chance,” they say, “and this is exacerbated when we try to deal in more extreme probabilities, such as 3 in 10,000.”

The researchers believe that the roulette wheel could be an important advance in shared decision making because patients are offered visual—rather than numerical—displays of the probability of benefits and harms.

Andrew Hyde | alfa
Further information:
http://www.plosmedicine.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Hepatitis: liver failure attributable to compromised blood supply
19.12.2018 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise
14.12.2018 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

Northwestern discovery tool is thousands of times faster than conventional screening methods

Different eras of civilization are defined by the discovery of new materials, as new materials drive new capabilities. And yet, identifying the best material...

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New megalibrary approach proves useful for the rapid discovery of new materials

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Artificial intelligence meets materials science

19.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

Gut microbiome regulates the intestinal immune system, researchers find

19.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>