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Planning For Disaster: M.I.T. Simulates a Major Supply Chain Disruption

03.04.2006


How would an outbreak of avian flu affect business worldwide? Let’s find out. MIT will be staging a real-time simulation of an avian flu outbreak to show how global supply chains are severely disrupted by such emergencies.



Developed by the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics, the simulation will involve a hypothetical outbreak of avian flu that shuts down a fictional manufacturing facility. A panel of executives will respond in real time to the unfolding emergency. "In this interconnected world where supply chains span the globe, companies must examine what actions they will need to take to protect employees, customers and the operational integrity of the enterprise in the event of a global emergency," said CTL Director Yossi Sheffi.

WHAT: "Planning for Disaster: M.I.T. Simulates a Major Supply Chain Disruption," a real-time simulation of an avian flu outbreak’s effect on global supply chains


AGENDA: http://ctl.mit.edu/index.pl?id=5017

WHEN: Tuesday, April 11, 2006. Simulation, 8:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., lecture and discussion 1:15-5:00 p.m.

WHERE: Cambridge Marriott Hotel, 2 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA

PLEASE RSVP TO: Heather Manning, MIT News Office, 617.253.1682 or hmanning@mit.edu

Heather Manning | MIT News Office
Further information:
http://www.mit.edu

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