Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New UK guidelines significantly widen criteria for heart disease and stroke prevention

21.12.2005


JBS 2: Joint British Societies’ guidelines on prevention of cardiovascular disease in clinical practice



New joint guidelines published by six professional societies today in Heart significantly widen the criteria for prevention of heart disease and stroke in primary care, and are set to boost the numbers of patients targeted for screening and preventive treatment.
The evidence based guidelines are a collaborative effort from the British Cardiac Society, the British Hypertension Society, Diabetes UK, HEART UK, the Primary Care Cardiovascular Society and the Stroke Association.

For the first time, the guidelines focus on cardiovascular disease as a whole, rather than just on coronary heart disease, in a bid to ensure consistent treatment for all those with already hardened and narrowed arteries - namely, heart attack, stroke and hardening of the arteries in the legs.



This second category will include apparently healthy people whose risk of cardiovascular disease is greater than or equal to 20 per cent over 10 years, and those with diabetes.

Screening for cardiovascular disease should be considered for: All adults aged 40 and older, with no history of heart attack, stroke, or diabetes, and not already being treated for high blood pressure or cholesterol All adults under 40 with a family history of developing hardened and narrowed arteries earlier than expected (under 65 for women and under 55 for men)

For those at high risk, the guidance sets targets for blood pressure, blood cholesterol and blood sugar (glycaemia).

Drug treatment is not recommended for healthy people whose risk of developing cardiovascular disease is less than 20 per cent over 10 years.

Professor David Woods, lead author of the guidelines comments: "The promise of preventive cardiology is to reduce the risk of having a heart attack or stroke. With professional lifestyle intervention and appropriate use of proven drug treatments, it is now possible to have a major impact on the commonest cause of death in the country. For people at high risk, this will mean less disability and a longer life."

Emma Dickinson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bmj.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator
11.12.2018 | Brigham and Women's Hospital

nachricht Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
10.12.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

11.12.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>