Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prematurity experts call for targeted research

19.09.2005


Research could improve clinical care, help educate women



A March of Dimes expert panel has recommended a targeted research agenda designed improve the lives of thousands of babies by preventing premature birth. The agenda has been published today in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

"Preterm birth is a complex disorder, like heart disease or diabetes, with no single cause, and it requires a multi-faceted approach," says Nancy S. Green, M.D., medical director of the March of Dimes and the article’s lead author. "We need to stimulate more funding for research in six promising areas that may lead to new clinical strategies for identifying who is at greatest risk for premature birth and how to prevent it."


Prematurity is the leading killer of America’s newborns, and those who survive often have lifelong health problems, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation, chronic lung disease, blindness, and hearing loss. As much as half of all neuro-developmental problems in children can be ascribed to premature birth, the authors of the paper say.

More than 12 percent of all babies in the United States each year – or nearly 500,000 -- are born prematurely (before 37 weeks completed gestation), and the rate of prematurity has increased by more than 30 percent since 1981. Babies born extremely prematurely (before 32 weeks gestation) suffer the greatest burden of death, complications and disabilities, so more research studies should focus on them, the authors say.

Dr. Green, the paper’s lead author, worked with the March of Dimes Scientific Advisory Committee on Prematurity, made up of experts from across the nation in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, women’s health, reproductive biology, nursing, and public health.

The authors of today’s paper identify six priority areas for a more targeted prematurity research agenda:

1. New epidemiologic studies focused on the risk of extremely preterm births to identify the factors that predispose women to very early labor and delivery;

2. Genes and their interaction with the environment, that, in concert, lead to preterm birth;

3. Racial and ethnic differences. While prematurity affects all socioeconomic groups, there are significant racial and ethnic disparities. For example, non-Hispanic African-Americans had the highest rate of premature babies at 17.8 percent in 2003, well above the national rate of 12.3 percent;

4. The roles of infection and immune response to those infections;

5. The effects of stress on the mother and fetus;

6. Clinical trials to assess the impact of potential treatments, to whom, and when during the course of pregnancy to be most effective.

Such research could lead to improvements in clinical care, and also help educate women about how to avoid risks that lead to premature birth, the authors said.

In 2005, the March of Dimes awarded the first of its new national Prematurity Research Initiative (PRI) grants at six major research institutions nationwide.

As part of it’s comprehensive fight against prematurity, the March of Dimes also is supporting proposed federal legislation that would expand research on prematurity and give states more flexibility to design their Medicaid programs to offer health care coverage to low-income pregnant women and their children as a way to prevent premature birth. The bills are: The "Prevent Prematurity and Improve Child Health Act of 2005" (S 710) and the Prematurity Research Expansion and Education for Mothers Who Deliver Infants Early (PREEMIE) Bill" (S 707).

"Research Agenda for Preterm Birth: Recommendation from the March of Dimes," appears in the September issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, volume 193, number 3.

Elizabeth Lynch | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.marchofdimes.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule
12.12.2018 | UT Southwestern Medical Center

nachricht Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain independently of one another
12.12.2018 | Technische Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

12.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain independently of one another

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>