Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Toasty oat aroma influenced by presence of health-linked polyphenols

01.09.2005


Penn State food scientists have shown that the amount of health-linked polyphenols present during roasting or baking influences the toasty aroma developed by oats and might be used to limit the generation of off-flavors in oat products.



Polyphenols are a large family of naturally occurring plant components that have been associated with a wide variety of health benefits. Flavonoids and some anti-oxidants belong to the polyphenol family and have been shown to have heart-healthy and anti-cancer effects, for example.

The polyphenols the Penn State team studied were hydroxycinnamic acids, which have been associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases or for optimal health.


Dr. Devin Peterson, assistant professor of food science and director of the study, says, "Our research has shown that polyphenols are key to aroma and flavor formation in oats during the Maillard reaction which is the browning process that occurs when foods are roasted or baked. Polyphenols have not been identified as major flavor producers before or associated with the Maillard reaction." Peterson presented his results today at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D. C. His paper is, "Effects of Phenolic Content on the Generation of Maillard-type Aroma Compounds in Toasted Oat Groats". His co-authors are Stacy L. Schwambach, master’s student, and Vandana A. Totlani, doctoral student.

In their experiments, Peterson and his research group took a batch of rolled oats and divided it into two samples. They boosted the level of polyphenols in one of the samples by an amount that can be found in nature and then roasted both samples. The sample that had the added polyphenols developed a lower level of Maillard-type aroma compounds as measured by gas chromatography and a panel of trained human sniffers.

The Penn State group’s analyses show that the polyphenols inhibit the Maillard reaction by tying up or quenching some of the sugars and other transient reaction products the process needs to proceed.

Peterson explains that the Maillard reaction not only produces desirable changes, such as a golden brown color and toasty aroma, but also can sometimes cause off-flavors or stale odors. The reaction not only proceeds during roasting or baking but also during storing. The new Penn State results suggest that controlling the levels of polyphenols, which are found naturally in all food plants, might prevent undesirable results of the Maillard reaction.

In addition, the Penn State scientist points out that the Maillard reaction also occurs in the human body as part of the aging process, in tanning, hardening of the arteries, and diabetes as well as other diseases.

"The polyphenols’ ability to quench sugars and inhibit the Maillard reaction may have positive implications for health besides improving the quality of food products," he says.

The study was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES).

Polyphenols are a large family of naturally occurring plant components that have been associated with a wide variety of health benefits. Flavonoids and some anti-oxidants belong to the polyphenol family and have been shown to have heart-healthy and anti-cancer effects, for example.

The polyphenols the Penn State team studied were hydroxycinnamic acids, which have been associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases or for optimal health.

Dr. Devin Peterson, assistant professor of food science and director of the study, says, "Our research has shown that polyphenols are key to aroma and flavor formation in oats during the Maillard reaction which is the browning process that occurs when foods are roasted or baked. Polyphenols have not been identified as major flavor producers before or associated with the Maillard reaction."

Peterson presented his results today at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Washington, D. C. His paper is, "Effects of Phenolic Content on the Generation of Maillard-type Aroma Compounds in Toasted Oat Groats". His co-authors are Stacy L. Schwambach, master’s student, and Vandana A. Totlani, doctoral student.

In their experiments, Peterson and his research group took a batch of rolled oats and divided it into two samples. They boosted the level of polyphenols in one of the samples by an amount that can be found in nature and then roasted both samples. The sample that had the added polyphenols developed a lower level of Maillard-type aroma compounds as measured by gas chromatography and a panel of trained human sniffers.

The Penn State group’s analyses show that the polyphenols inhibit the Maillard reaction by tying up or quenching some of the sugars and other transient reaction products the process needs to proceed.

Peterson explains that the Maillard reaction not only produces desirable changes, such as a golden brown color and toasty aroma, but also can sometimes cause off-flavors or stale odors. The reaction not only proceeds during roasting or baking but also during storing. The new Penn State results suggest that controlling the levels of polyphenols, which are found naturally in all food plants, might prevent undesirable results of the Maillard reaction.

In addition, the Penn State scientist points out that the Maillard reaction also occurs in the human body as part of the aging process, in tanning, hardening of the arteries, and diabetes as well as other diseases.

"The polyphenols’ ability to quench sugars and inhibit the Maillard reaction may have positive implications for health besides improving the quality of food products," he says.

Barbara Hale | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.psu.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'
16.11.2018 | Purdue University

nachricht Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal
14.11.2018 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New materials: Growing polymer pelts

19.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Earthquake researchers finalists for supercomputing prize

19.11.2018 | Information Technology

Controlling organ growth with light

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>