Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Why some lung cancers stop responding to Tarceva and Iressa

22.02.2005


Researchers at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) have found an explanation for why some lung cancers stop responding to the drugs erlotinib (TarcevaTM) and gefitinib (Iressa®). This discovery may lead to the development of new therapies to use when these agents stop working. The research is to be published online in the open-access international journal PLoS Medicine on February 22, 2005.*

Gefitinib and erlotinib are so-called targeted therapies, in that they halt the growth of certain cancers by zeroing in on a signaling molecule critical to the survival of those cancer cells. The two drugs are effective in about 10 percent of US patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previous work from this group at MSKCC and from groups at Harvard Medical School showed that the two drugs work specifically in patients whose cancers contain mutations in a gene that encodes the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The MSKCC team has also shown that lung cancer patients with these mutations are often people who have never smoked.

"Although these targeted therapies are initially effective in this subset of patients, the drugs eventually stop working, and the tumors begin to grow again. We call this acquired or secondary resistance," said Vincent A. Miller, MD, a thoracic oncologist at MSKCC and one of the study’s two lead authors. "This is different from primary resistance, which means that the drugs never work at all," Dr. Miller said.



The study involved six patients who had received treatment with gefitinib or erlotinib and who later developed acquired resistance. Researchers studied samples taken from the patients’ tumors at different times before and during treatment. All of the tumors had the kinds of mutations in the EGFR gene that were previously associated with responsiveness to these drugs. But, in three of the six patients, they found that tumors that grew despite continued therapy had an additional mutation in the EGFR gene, strongly implying that the second mutation was the cause of drug resistance. Further biochemical studies showed that this second EGFR mutation, which was the same in all three tumors, could confer resistance to the EGFR mutants normally sensitive to these drugs.

"It is especially interesting that the mutation we found is strictly analogous to a mutation that makes other kinds of tumors resistant to another targeted therapy, imatinib mesylate (Gleevec®)," said Harold Varmus, President of MSKCC and senior author of the study. "Acquired resistance to Gleevec is a well-known problem, and understanding its molecular causes has led to the design of other drugs that overcome that resistance," Dr. Varmus said. Imatinib mesylate is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), a stomach tumor called gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), and other tumors caused by mutations in signaling enzymes like EGFR.

Non-small cell lung cancer makes up about 80 percent of all lung cancers. Mutations in a gene called KRAS (pronounced KAY-rass),which encodes a signaling protein activated by EGFR, are found in 15 to 30 percent of these cancers. The presence of a mutated KRAS gene in a biopsy sample is associated with primary resistance to these drugs, as reported by the same group of MSKCC investigators in the January, 2005, issue of PLoS Medicine. At this time there is no targeted therapy for patients with KRAS mutations.
"Tumor cells from patients in our study who developed secondary resistance to gefitinib and erlotinib after an initial response on therapy did not have mutations in KRAS. Rather, these tumor cells had new mutations in EGFR. This further indicates that secondary resistance is very different from primary resistance," said William Pao, MD, PhD, a molecular biologist and thoracic oncologist and the study’s other lead author. "We are now trying to figure out other possible reasons why gefitinib or erlotinib stop working. We also hope to identify mutations in other potential cancer-causing genes that are critical for lung cancers to survive. Even though many mutated oncogenes have already been found, the crucial genes are still unaccounted for in about 50 percent of non-small cell cancers," Dr. Pao said.

Esther Carver | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mskcc.org
http://www.plosmedicine.org
http://www.plos.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'
16.11.2018 | Purdue University

nachricht Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal
14.11.2018 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>