Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Malaria experts to unveil top-flight research during international conference at The University of Nottingham

04.02.2005


Some of the world’s leading authorities on tropical diseases and parasitic infections will gather for an international conference at The University of Nottingham to discuss the latest breakthroughs in research and treatments.



The combined British Society for Parasitology Spring Meeting and the international Malaria Meeting, being held at University Park from April 3 to April 6, will mark the first unveiling of studies into a range of topics, including anti-parasite drugs, parasite genomics, fish and wildlife parasites and population genetics.

The meeting has been organised by the University’s Parasite Biology and Immunogenetics research group in the School of Biology. Preparations for the event come at a time when the World Health Organisation is warning of an increased risk of some tropical diseases, including malaria and dengue fever, in tsunami-affected areas in Southeast Asia and a scaling-up of prevention activities to avert outbreaks.


Most affected countries in the region hit by the tsunami are endemic for dengue fever and malaria. With the onset of the rainy season, particularly in Indonesia and Sri Lanka, a rise in the cases can be expected at this time of the year. However, an increase in stagnant water in some areas — which provide an ideal breeding ground for some disease-carrying mosquitoes — could also potentially lead to severe public health problems.

Among the top speakers at the Malaria Meeting will be Professor Nick White, an internationally-renowned expert from the Wellcome Trust team based in Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, who will deliver a talk on the subject of the pathophysiology of malaria.

The meeting will also include the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene special symposium on malaria in pregnancy. Pregnancy reduces immunity to malaria and up to 200,000 newborn infant deaths are caused by the disease every year in Africa.

Among the other topical subjects being discussed at the meeting will be fish parasitology. Recent news reports have told how parasites such as the worm Gyrodactylus salaris could threaten salmon stocks in Scotland’s River Tweed if it spreads to the UK from Scandanavia and Europe, where it has already caused widespread devastation.

Other sessions will look at immunomodulation by parasites, where parasites affect the immune system to provide protection against diseases including allergies and asthma — an effect that has been observed in widespread parts of the undeveloped world. Researchers are now studying how parasites affect the outcome of other diseases such as HIV, malaria and TB.

The meeting is expected to host 350–400 delegates from all over the world, including Africa, the Middle East, the US, Australia, Uganda, Kenya, Thailand and South Africa. Running for the duration of the meeting will be a biotech fair where companies can showcase their latest products, for example, lab-based equipment to delegates. Among the top sponsors of the event are Elsevier, Serotec, Biorad and SLS but the organisers are currently seeking companies, including those local to Nottingham, that would be willing to offer their support for the meeting.

Professor Jan Bradley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>