Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hold the stuffing: Low-glycemic diet may help keep weight off

24.11.2004


Dieters have higher metabolism, feel less hungry

Preliminary data from Children’s Hospital Boston and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, published in the November 24 JAMA, suggest that weight-loss diets may be more effective when dieters seek to reduce glycemic load – the amount their blood glucose rises after a meal – rather than limit fat intake. The findings indicate that a low-glycemic diet may overcome the body’s natural tendency to slow metabolism and turn on hunger cues to "make up" the missing calories.

The low-glycemic-load (low-GL) diet reduces carbohydrates that are rapidly digested and that raise blood sugar and insulin to high levels -- such as white bread, refined breakfast cereals, and concentrated sugars. Instead, it emphasizes carbohydrates that release sugar more slowly, including whole grains, most fruits, vegetables, nuts, and legumes. "Our data suggest that the type of calories consumed – independent of the amount – can alter metabolic rate," says Dr. David Ludwig, director of the Optimal Weight for Life (OWL) obesity program at Children’s Hospital Boston and the study’s senior investigator. "That hasn’t been shown before. The idea that ’a calorie is a calorie is a calorie’ doesn’t really explain why conventional weight-loss diets usually don’t work for more than a few months."



Ludwig and colleagues randomized 46 overweight or obese adults aged 18 to 40 to consume one of two diets: a standard low-fat diet or a low-GL diet. Both diets provided approximately 1500 calories/day and were designed to produce a 10% weight loss in 6 to 10 weeks. However, the low-GL diet was higher in fat and made various carbohydrate substitutions, such as steel-cut oats instead of instant oatmeal, blueberries instead of raisins, and cracked-wheat bread instead of tortilla chips.

The 39 subjects who remained in the study succeeded in losing about 10% of their initial body weight. The low-GL dieters had smaller decreases in resting energy expenditure (averaging 96 kcal/day, or 5.9%) than the low-fat dieters (averaging 176 kcal/day, or 10.6%), meaning their metabolism did not slow as much. They also reported less hunger each day while on their diets.

"Almost anyone can lose weight in the short term – very few keep it off in the long term," says Ludwig. "That’s given rise to the notion that the body has a ’setpoint’ – and that when you diet, internal mechanisms work to restore your weight to that setpoint. A low-GL diet may work better with these internal biological responses to create the greatest likelihood of long-term weight loss."

Confirming other research, Ludwig’s team also found that the low-GL group had significantly greater improvements in insulin resistance (a risk factor for diabetes) and serum triglyceride and C-reactive protein levels (risk factors for cardiovascular disease). They now have a long-term study, in a larger group of subjects, to see if people on the low-GL diet can indeed keep off the lost pounds.

Dr. Mark Pereira of the Children’s Hospital Boston Department of Medicine (now at the University of Minnesota) was first author on the study.

Children’s Hospital Boston is recruiting adults for a large-scale, 18-month study of the low-GL diet. Subjects will receive comprehensive dietary and behavioral counseling in individual and group sessions that will enable them to put low-GL diets into effect. Subjects must be overweight, 18 to 35 years old, and motivated to attend weekly sessions for four months. People interested in enrolling should contact Erica Garcia-Lago at 617-355-2500.

Bess Andrews | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.childrenshospital.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibiotics
21.06.2018 | SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)

nachricht Scientists learn more about how gene linked to autism affects brain
19.06.2018 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

22.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>