Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Adding Omega-3s To Food No Simple Task

27.07.2004


As the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids reach the awareness of consumers eager to improve the functions of their body—from the cardiovascular system to the brain—food makers are scurrying to enrich and fortify products with omega-3s and get them to market. But one major obstacle tempers progress—flavor.



Great sources for omega-3s are fish oils, algal oils and linseed oil. Each can be highly susceptible to oxidation, however. That deteriorates flavor, increases the risk of rancidity and reduces shelf-life.

“Many food companies still don’t believe that fish oils can be put in food and that it can still taste good, but there are methods,” said Ian Newton of Ceres Consulting in Canada.


Proper handling techniques and special fortification can remedy these hurdles in many cases, and research is moving forward to find more flavorful fortification techniques.

Speaking recently at the Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo, the world’s largest annual food science and ingredient convention, scientists described one problem in omega-3 fortification is the compounds that serve as efficient antioxidants can, conversely, increase oxidation in complex food systems.

In a case study of omega-3 fatty acids in mayonnaise, researchers with the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research found that the dressing’s low pH, combined with high iron content—caused by egg yolks in mayonnaise—are main factors that cause lipid oxidation. They suggested that flavor could perhaps be improved with lower iron levels.

Studies by the same team on the flavor quality of milk that had been fortified showed that flavor improved dramatically when rapeseed oil was used as the source of omega 3s.

Copper can be as big a problem as iron in causing oxidation. Newton described a case of omega-3 enriched margarine makers who experienced an increase in the fishy flavor of their product while at the same time its shelf-life decreased.

“Finally, they realized it started when they changed sea salt suppliers. The new sea salt. . .contained just a small level of copper that triggered a large amount of oxidation,” he said

Foods that contain any levels of peroxide will also have oxidation problems, said the researchers.

Retaining the flavor and shelf life of omega-3 fortified foods can be a simple matter of carefully handling products and thoughtful placement of oils in the ingredient stream, said Brian Langdon, of Omega Protein Inc.

Adding omega-3s as close to the end of the ingredient stream as possible is helpful, he reported, with the best time to add is before the final mixing of the product.

According to the panelists, some products that are emerging as the best for omega-3 fortification include frozen food entrees, soups, refrigerated foods, salad dressings, yogurts, spreads, juices, egg products and cheeses, which are especially helpful in providing omega-3s due to their attraction to a wide audience, ranging from children to the elderly.

The Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo delivers comprehensive, cutting-edge research and opinion from food science-, technology-, marketing- and business-leaders. Now in it’s 64th year, the IFT Annual Meeting and Food Expo July 12-16 in Las Vegas attracted 19,565 attendees and 950 exhibiting companies.

The 2005 convention is July 16-20 in New Orleans.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.ift.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Why might reading make myopic?
18.07.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

nachricht Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness
11.07.2018 | McGill University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences

Machine-learning predicted a superhard and high-energy-density tungsten nitride

18.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Why might reading make myopic?

18.07.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>