Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers Urge Awareness of West Nile Symptoms

23.07.2004


Since West Nile virus is expected to be prominent again this summer – especially on the West Coast – University of Toronto researchers are urging physicians to be on the lookout for its most common manifestations.

A U of T study, published in the May issue of the quarterly Canadian Journal of Neuroscience, found that among hospitalized patients in Toronto with West Nile virus (WNV), encephalitis was the most common neurological manifestation. More surprisingly, encephalitis was an apparent risk factor for neuromuscular complications; it’s very rare for this brain infection to involve other parts of the nervous system.

“It is important to keep West Nile virus in mind in the summer and early fall when faced with unexplained neurological presentations such as encephalitis and paralysis, not only to guide investigations, but to identify those who may benefit from available therapies,” says Dr. Cheryl Jaigobin, a professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto and a neurologist at the University Health Network. Jaigobin co-authored the study with Dr. Jodie Burton, a senior neurology resident.



Data from the WNV outbreak in Toronto indicate that more than 50 per cent of the 26 WNV patients admitted to four Toronto tertiary-care facilities in August and September 2002 had neurological disease. Seventy-eight per cent had encephalitis and, of those, 82 per cent developed neuromuscular dysfunction within days.

The Toronto experience was similar to earlier experiences of WNV infection in New York City, Israel, Louisiana and Cleveland. In all cases, advanced age and a compromised immune system were associated with a worse outcome.

The study’s authors recommend that physicians follow the currently accepted WNV testing regimen. They also suggest that electrodiagnostic testing be performed in patients with unexplained weakness and in those who are critically ill to rule out acute flaccid paralysis syndrome, a severe neuromuscular complication of the disease which may lead to prolonged disability or death.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.utoronto.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht When wheels and heads are spinning - DFG research project on motion sickness in automated driving
22.05.2019 | Technische Universität Berlin

nachricht A new approach to targeting cancer cells
20.05.2019 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

Im Focus: A step towards probabilistic computing

Working group led by physicist Professor Ulrich Nowak at the University of Konstanz, in collaboration with a team of physicists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, demonstrates how skyrmions can be used for the computer concepts of the future

When it comes to performing a calculation destined to arrive at an exact result, humans are hopelessly inferior to the computer. In other areas, humans are...

Im Focus: Recording embryonic development

Scientists develop a molecular recording tool that enables in vivo lineage tracing of embryonic cells

The beginning of new life starts with a fascinating process: A single cell gives rise to progenitor cells that eventually differentiate into the three germ...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases

22.05.2019 | Life Sciences

New study finds distinct microbes living next to corals

22.05.2019 | Life Sciences

Stellar waltz with dramatic ending

22.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>