Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Protein marker predicts possible heart damage after chemotherapy

18.05.2004


High levels of troponin I (TNI) protein in the blood helps identify possible heart damage after cancer treatment, according to a report in today’s rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.



The report also suggests that tracking TNI levels can help doctors form a heart disease prevention plan for some chemotherapy patients. "Damage to the heart is one of the most worrisome long-term side effects of high-dose chemotherapy," said lead author Daniela Cardinale, M.D., deputy director of the cardiology unit at the European Institute of Oncology in Milan, Italy. "Therefore, it is important to identify biochemical markers that might indicate which patients are at greatest risk and how severe their heart disease might be."

TNI is a protein present exclusively in heart cells. The TNI blood concentration is a well-established marker of heart muscle injury that’s widely used to diagnose and treat heart attacks and other acute coronary syndromes.


"Our study is the first to clearly show, in an adult population, that the risk of cardiac events in cancer patients can be predicted by evaluating the TNI release pattern after chemotherapy," Cardinale said.

In cancer patients who have had chemotherapy, physicians usually use extensive testing and expensive monitoring equipment to identify which patients may have cardiac toxicity, Cardinale said. These methods "have low sensitivity, poor predictive value and, in some cases, technical limitations. Moreover, these methods identify cardiac damage only when it has already occurred and, in most cases, is not reversible," she said. "Evaluating TNI value after chemotherapy is an easy, non-invasive, low-cost method that allows us to categorize the risk of cardiac events in cancer patients in the three years following chemotherapy."

Researchers took blood samples of 703 cancer patients to measure TNI soon after high-dose chemotherapy and one month later. TNI values higher than 0.08 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) were considered TNI "positive," while lower values were TNI "negative." They found that 145 patients (21 percent) were TNI positive right after chemotherapy, and 63 patients (9 percent) were positive immediately after chemotherapy and one month later.

The researchers found no significant reduction in heart function at the three-year follow-up in patients who were TNI negative. These patients had only a 1 percent incidence of cardiac events, such as heart attacks.

In contrast, the cardiac event incidence was 37 percent among the patients who were TNI positive immediately after chemotherapy and 84 percent among those who remained positive a month later.

Cardinale said the study has several important implications for cancer treatment:
  • TNI categorizes heart disease risk early, long before impairment in heart function and symptoms develop, and when many preventive treatments would probably help prevent long-term health effects.

  • TNI could assess and monitor the safety and effectiveness of different treatments.

  • Heart-protective therapies that might limit or prevent the TNI rise after chemotherapy, and heart treatments that interfere with TNI persistence could improve the future heart health of these patients.

"The results of this study provide a rational need for doctors to use this marker to guide them in their cardiac evaluations and treatments of high-dose chemotherapy patients," Cardinale said.

Co-authors are: Maria T. Sandri, M.D.; Alessandro Colombo, M.D.; Nicola Colombo, M.D.; Marina Boeri, M.S.; Giuseppina Lamantia, M.D.; Maurizio Civelli, M.D.; Fedro Peccatori, M.D.; Giovanni Martinelli, M.D.; Cesare Fiorentini, M.D.; and Carlo M. Cipolla, M.D.

Carole Bullock | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.americanheart.org/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New method uses just a drop of blood to monitor lung cancer treatment
19.10.2018 | Osaka University

nachricht Photoactive bacteria bait may help in fight against MRSA infections
12.10.2018 | Purdue University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz (Germany) together with scientists from Dresden, Leipzig, Sofia (Bulgaria) and Madrid (Spain) have now developed and characterized a novel, metal-organic material which displays electrical properties mimicking those of highly crystalline silicon. The material which can easily be fabricated at room temperature could serve as a replacement for expensive conventional inorganic materials used in optoelectronics.

Silicon, a so called semiconductor, is currently widely employed for the development of components such as solar cells, LEDs or computer chips. High purity...

Im Focus: Storage & Transport of highly volatile Gases made safer & cheaper by the use of “Kinetic Trapping"

Augsburg chemists present a new technology for compressing, storing and transporting highly volatile gases in porous frameworks/New prospects for gas-powered vehicles

Storage of highly volatile gases has always been a major technological challenge, not least for use in the automotive sector, for, for example, methane or...

Im Focus: Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

When we put water in a freezer, water molecules crystallize and form ice. This change from one phase of matter to another is called a phase transition. While this transition, and countless others that occur in nature, typically takes place at the same fixed conditions, such as the freezing point, one can ask how it can be influenced in a controlled way.

We are all familiar with such control of the freezing transition, as it is an essential ingredient in the art of making a sorbet or a slushy. To make a cold...

Im Focus: Micro energy harvesters for the Internet of Things

Fraunhofer IWS Dresden scientists print electronic layers with polymer ink

Thin organic layers provide machines and equipment with new functions. They enable, for example, tiny energy recuperators. In future, these will be installed...

Im Focus: Dynamik einzelner Proteine

Neue Messmethode erlaubt es Forschenden, die Bewegung von Molekülen lange und genau zu verfolgen

Das Zusammenspiel aus Struktur und Dynamik bestimmt die Funktion von Proteinen, den molekularen Werkzeugen der Zelle. Durch Fortschritte in der...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Conference to pave the way for new therapies

17.10.2018 | Event News

Berlin5GWeek: Private industrial networks and temporary 5G connectivity islands

16.10.2018 | Event News

5th International Conference on Cellular Materials (CellMAT), Scientific Programme online

02.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Nanocages in the lab and in the computer: how DNA-based dendrimers transport nanoparticles

19.10.2018 | Life Sciences

Thin films from Braunschweig on the way to Mercury

19.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

App-App-Hooray! - Innovative Kits for AR Applications

19.10.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>