Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Newborn brain injuries stem from infections, not delivery

09.02.2004


Medical malpractice cases frequently try to link injuries to the white matter of a newborn’s brain -- a precursor to cerebral palsy and other disorders -- to the baby’s delivery, though a new Johns Hopkins study demonstrates that such injuries are more closely associated with neonatal infections.



White matter, the tracts of nerve fibers that communicate messages in the brain, is generally injured at so-called "end zones" between the long, penetrating arteries that supply blood to the brain. These zones are susceptible to the type of fall in cerebral blood flow and oxygen that could occur during complications in delivery, as marked by excess acid in the umbilical cord.

The Hopkins team reviewed medical records of 150 premature babies who had white matter injuries and were born between May 1994 and September 2001. They compared each baby’s delivery to that of the next healthy baby delivered at the same gestational age (23-24 weeks), looking for causes of problems.


The researchers found that acid levels in the umbilical cords were similar in both brain-injured and healthy babies, as were many other factors such as maternal infections and the percentage born by Caesarean versus vaginal delivery. The only difference noted was that brain-injured babies were more likely to have evidence of infections of the cerebrospinal fluid, blood and windpipe.

"Our study refutes the fact that white matter injuries are caused by delivery," says Ernest Graham, M.D., senior study author and assistant professor of gynecology/obstetrics. "The biggest association with these injuries in our study was clearly neonatal infections."

Graham says while you can treat the infections after birth, it’s hard to know when they originated. Also, even if the infections are treated, the babies could still be at higher risk for permanent brain damage.


Graham, Ernest et al, "Neonatal White Matter Injury is Associated with Culture Positive Infections and Only Rarely with Metabolic Acidosis."

The above news tip is based on an abstract or poster to be presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine’s 24th Annual Meeting, held Feb. 2-7 in New Orleans.

To pursue this story, please contact Trent Stockton at 410-955-8665 or tstockt1@jhmi.edu. Please observe the embargo.

Trent Stockton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First diode for magnetic fields

Innsbruck quantum physicists have constructed a diode for magnetic fields and then tested it in the laboratory. The device, developed by the research groups led by the theorist Oriol Romero-Isart and the experimental physicist Gerhard Kirchmair, could open up a number of new applications.

Electric diodes are essential electronic components that conduct electricity in one direction but prevent conduction in the opposite one. They are found at the...

Im Focus: Nonstop Tranport of Cargo in Nanomachines

Max Planck researchers revel the nano-structure of molecular trains and the reason for smooth transport in cellular antennas.

Moving around, sensing the extracellular environment, and signaling to other cells are important for a cell to function properly. Responsible for those tasks...

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helping to Transport Proteins Inside the Cell

21.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Meta-surface corrects for chromatic aberrations across all kinds of lenses

21.11.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Removing toxic mercury from contaminated water

21.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>