Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New dressing for wound developed at Hebrew University promises faster and improved healing

19.01.2004


A novel wound dressing made of genetically engineered human collagen that will enable faster and improved healing of injuries has been developed by researchers at the Hebrew University Faculty of Dental Medicine.


Prof. Shmuel Shoshan



Collagen is the most abundant protein in the animal kingdom, including humans. It is the major constituent of connective tissues – tendons, skin, bones, cartilage, blood vessel walls and membranes. Collagen fibers are the “warp and woof” of these connective tissues and are responsible for keeping all the body’s organs and tissues in their correct functional structure.

There are different collagen-containing preparations on the market today made for treating wounds, for use in dentistry implants, and in cosmetics. All of them use collagen made from animal tissues, which requires specific adaptation in order to eliminate immunological rejection or to prevent microbiological infection.


The dressing developed at the Hebrew University incorporates an inner layer of genetically engineered, human recombinant collagen. This material becomes a soluble, readily enzymatically degradable molecule in the wound tissue. The molecular fragments that are thus formed have been shown to play a pivotal role in the healing process. An outer layer, also of biological origin, is provided in the wound dressing to provide initial protection prior to release of the delicate collagen layer.

Preliminary animal experiments with the new dressing have shown substantially faster and better healing, with rapid formation of new collagen fibers, than has been possible using older methods.

The new dressing is the fruit of many years of experimentation with collagen in the laboratory of Prof. Emeritus Shmuel Shoshan of the Connective Tissue Research Laboratory of the Hebrew University Faculty of Dental Medicine. Prof. Shoshan is the inventor and chief scientist of Dittekol Ltd., a company formed in cooperation with the Hebrew University’s Yissum Research Development Company, to commercialize the new wound dressing. The company is now negotiating with investors for further development.



For further information: Jerry Barach, Dept. of Media Relations, the Hebrew University, Tel: 02-588-2904

Jerry Barach | Hebrew University

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator
11.12.2018 | Brigham and Women's Hospital

nachricht Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
10.12.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

11.12.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>