Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Contrast mammography reveals hard-to-find cancers

30.09.2003


A new technique accurately identifies breast cancers that are difficult to detect with conventional mammography, according to a study appearing in the October issue of the journal Radiology.



"The dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography technique is feasible for hard-to-demonstrate breast cancers and is worthy of further study," said the study’s lead author, John M. Lewin, M.D. Dr. Lewin is an associate professor of radiology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, and director of breast imaging research and co-director of breast imaging at the University of Colorado Hospital Breast Center in Aurora.

Conventional mammography misses 10 percent to 20 percent of breast cancers, including 9 percent of those that can be felt during physical examination.


Dual-energy, contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography involves the injection of a contrast agent to highlight new blood vessel development that accompanies malignant growth. Two images are taken at different energy levels and subtracted from one another to disclose the tumor. Similar techniques are being successfully employed in other areas of radiology.

"We expect that dual-energy, contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography will become an alternative to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluating difficult to interpret mammograms or for screening women who have an elevated risk for breast cancer," Dr. Lewin said. "This technique may also be useful for examining breasts of women who have already been diagnosed with one cancer to identify potential undetected malignancies," he added.

For the study, the researchers used dual-energy, contrast-enhanced digital subtraction mammography to evaluate 26 patients whose mammograms or breast exams warranted a biopsy.

"By using a contrast agent with digital mammography, we were able to see cancers that were invisible on conventional mammography. About half of the women in the study had cancer, and this technique lit up all the malignancies," Dr. Lewin said.

Specifically, the researchers found that 13 of the patients had invasive cancers. Eleven of the invasive cancers were strongly enhanced, one showed moderate enhancement and another was weakly enhanced. In another patient, a case of intraductal carcinoma in situ showed a weakly enhanced duct. The 12 benign cases either showed weak enhancement or none at all.

Dr. Lewin said that the new technique is less costly than MRI, which is being used to screen high-risk women. The procedure is similar to conventional mammography with the addition of an intravenous injection.

"This is still a research technique," Dr. Lewin said. "If the results we achieve in further research are as good as what we have so far reported, then I expect this could be clinically available in two to five years."

The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, the University of California, San Francisco and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston are planning a joint clinical trial to study this technique’s appropriateness for screening women at very high risk for breast cancer. The trial would begin in October 2004.


Radiology is a monthly scientific journal devoted to clinical radiology and allied sciences. The journal is edited by Anthony V. Proto, M.D., School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia. Radiology is owned and published by the Radiological Society of North America Inc. (http://radiology.rsnajnls.org).

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) is an association of more than 33,000 radiologists, radiation oncologists and related scientists committed to promoting excellence through education and by fostering research, with the ultimate goal of improving patient care. The Society’s headquarters are located at 820 Jorie Boulevard, Oak Brook, Ill. 60523-2251. (http://www.rsna.org).

"Dual-Energy, Contrast-enhanced Digital Subtraction Mammography: Feasibility." Collaborating with Dr. Lewin on this study were Pamela K. Isaacs, D.O., Virginia Vance, R.N., and Fred J. Larke, M.S.

Maureen Morley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rsna.org
http://radiology.rsnajnls.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Deep stimulation improves cognitive control by augmenting brain rhythms
04.04.2019 | Picower Institute at MIT

nachricht Black nanoparticles slow the growth of tumors
04.04.2019 | Technische Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...

Im Focus: Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

Quantum computers promise to solve certain computational problems exponentially faster than any classical machine. “A particularly promising application is the...

Im Focus: Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

The technology could revolutionize how information travels through data centers and artificial intelligence networks

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers...

Im Focus: A long-distance relationship in femtoseconds

Physicists observe how electron-hole pairs drift apart at ultrafast speed, but still remain strongly bound.

Modern electronics relies on ultrafast charge motion on ever shorter length scales. Physicists from Regensburg and Gothenburg have now succeeded in resolving a...

Im Focus: Researchers 3D print metamaterials with novel optical properties

Engineers create novel optical devices, including a moth eye-inspired omnidirectional microwave antenna

A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a series of 3D printed metamaterials with unique microwave or optical properties that go beyond what is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

09.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>