Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Anti-cholesterol statins do not reduce reproductive hormones in women of child-bearing age

02.01.2003


Physicians have been concerned that relatively new prescription medications called statins, which are being increasingly prescribed to reduce blood cholesterol levels, might also decrease reproductive hormone levels and cause women of child-bearing age to be less fertile.



A study headed by researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles found that neither the use of statins nor low blood cholesterol levels significantly affected reproductive hormone levels in pre-, peri-, or postmenopausal women. These findings are the subject of an article appearing in the current issue of the American Journal of Medicine.

Specialists in heart disease and stroke typically urge patients to maintain low levels of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and total cholesterol in the blood, but a certain amount of cholesterol is necessary. In fact, reproductive hormones are derivatives of cholesterol, which led researchers to wonder if statins, which reduce blood cholesterol, might also reduce reproductive hormones.


According to C. Noel Bairey Merz, M.D., the report’s first author and the primary investigator of the WISE Study, "Although statins have been shown to be safe in clinical trials, fewer than 20 percent of trial participants have been women, and previous studies of the impact on reproductive hormones did not include premenopausal women of childbearing age."

Dr. Bairey Merz is director of Cedars-Sinai’Medical Center’s Preventive and Rehabilitative Cardiac Center, and director of the Women’s Health Program. She also holds the Women’s Guild Chair in Women’s Health at Cedars-Sinai.

The new study included 453 women with coronary risk factors who were undergoing coronary angiography for suspected ischemia – lack of oxygen to the heart – at four academic medical centers in the United States. Of the total, 114 women were premenopausal. Data analyzed were drawn from an ongoing study, the Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

"Neither blood lipoprotein level nor use of statins was a significant independent predictor of reproductive hormone levels in models that adjusted for age, menopausal status, menstrual phase, and body mass index," according to the article.

Although the results offer more reassurance that statin use is safe, Dr. Bairey Merz noted that the women in this sample were undergoing testing for suspected myocardial ischemia and may not be representative of the general population. She said additional large-scale studies that would further reduce potential variables should be conducted, focusing particularly on women in their child-bearing years.


The work was supported by The Women’s Guild of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center; The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (contracts N01-HV-68161, N01-HV-68162, N01-HV-68163, and N01-HV-68164); a General Clinical Research Center grant MO1-RR00425 from the National Center for Research Resources, Bethesda, Md.; a grant from the Gustavus and Louis Pfeiffer Research Foundation, Danville, N.J.; and a grant from The Ladies Hospital Aid Society of Western Pennsylvania, Pittsburgh.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is one of the largest nonprofit academic medical centers in the Western United States. For the fifth straight two-year period, it has been named Southern California’s gold standard in health care in an independent survey. Cedars-Sinai is internationally renowned for its diagnostic and treatment capabilities and its broad spectrum of programs and services, as well as breakthrough in biomedical research and superlative medical education. Named one of the 100 "Most Wired" hospitals in health care in 2001, the Medical Center ranks among the top 10 non-university hospitals in the nation for its research activities.

IRB #2398 Women’s Ischemic Symptom Evaluation (WISE) - Blood Hormone Level Determination

CITATION: American Journal of Medicine, December 2002, Volume 113, Number 9, "Cholesterol-Lowering Medication, Cholesterol Level, and Reproductive Hormones in Women: The Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE)."


Sandra Van | Van Communications
Further information:
http://www.csmc.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Lung images of twins with asthma add to understanding of the disease
06.12.2019 | University of Western Ontario

nachricht Between Arousal and Inhibition
06.12.2019 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing a digital twin

University of Texas and MIT researchers create virtual UAVs that can predict vehicle health, enable autonomous decision-making

In the not too distant future, we can expect to see our skies filled with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) delivering packages, maybe even people, from location...

Im Focus: The coldest reaction

With ultracold chemistry, researchers get a first look at exactly what happens during a chemical reaction

The coldest chemical reaction in the known universe took place in what appears to be a chaotic mess of lasers. The appearance deceives: Deep within that...

Im Focus: How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

Abnormal scarring is a serious threat resulting in non-healing chronic wounds or fibrosis. Scars form when fibroblasts, a type of cell of connective tissue, reach wounded skin and deposit plugs of extracellular matrix. Until today, the question about the exact anatomical origin of these fibroblasts has not been answered. In order to find potential ways of influencing the scarring process, the team of Dr. Yuval Rinkevich, Group Leader for Regenerative Biology at the Institute of Lung Biology and Disease at Helmholtz Zentrum München, aimed to finally find an answer. As it was already known that all scars derive from a fibroblast lineage expressing the Engrailed-1 gene - a lineage not only present in skin, but also in fascia - the researchers intentionally tried to understand whether or not fascia might be the origin of fibroblasts.

Fibroblasts kit - ready to heal wounds

Im Focus: McMaster researcher warns plastic pollution in Great Lakes growing concern to ecosystem

Research from a leading international expert on the health of the Great Lakes suggests that the growing intensity and scale of pollution from plastics poses serious risks to human health and will continue to have profound consequences on the ecosystem.

In an article published this month in the Journal of Waste Resources and Recycling, Gail Krantzberg, a professor in the Booth School of Engineering Practice...

Im Focus: Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Prototype microscope teaches itself the best illumination settings for diagnosing malaria

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The Future of Work

03.12.2019 | Event News

First International Conference on Agrophotovoltaics in August 2020

15.11.2019 | Event News

Laser Symposium on Electromobility in Aachen: trends for the mobility revolution

15.11.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Solving the mystery of carbon on ocean floor

06.12.2019 | Earth Sciences

Chip-based optical sensor detects cancer biomarker in urine

06.12.2019 | Life Sciences

A platform for stable quantum computing, a playground for exotic physics

06.12.2019 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>