Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Signaling pathway in melanoma could provide target for diagnosis, prevention and treatment

05.12.2002


Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a signaling pathway that is turned on when benign moles turn into early-stage malignant melanoma. The pathway could provide a new target for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of the most lethal form of skin cancer. The research was reported in the December issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research.



A team of Emory scientists led by Jack L. Arbiser, MD, PhD, found that the signaling pathway called mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) is abnormally turned on in melanoma, particularly in its early stages. The investigators studied levels of activated MAP kinase in 131 tissue samples from precancerous moles (atypical nevi) and malignant melanomas. They found high levels of activated MAP kinase in early melanomas, but not in moles that are the precursors to melanoma.

In addition to MAP kinase activation, the Emory investigators studied two genes known to be up-regulated by the MAP kinase –– vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and tissue factor (TF). These genes also are known to be powerful stimulators of angiogenesis, which is the growth of microscopic blood vessels that nourishes cancerous tumors and leads to unregulated cell growth. The development of dormant tumors into actively proliferating tumors requires angiogenesis.


Dr. Arbiser and his colleagues did not find evidence of VEGF and TF in precancerous moles, but they did find these two target genes present in early melanomas.

According to the American Cancer Society, patients who have melanoma that has not spread below the skin have a survival rate of 96 percent beyond five years. But as the tumor begins to grow, the survival rate falls to 61 percent if the disease has reached the lymph nodes below the skin and 12 percent if it has spread to other organs in the body. Melanoma is the sixth most common form of cancer in U.S. men and the seventh most common form in U.S. women. The Cancer Society estimates that 53,600 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2002 and that 7,400 people will die from it.

"Our finding is of interest for two reasons," Dr. Arbiser says. "First, it may help physicians determine whether a mole is malignant, which is often difficult. Second, drugs that target MAP kinase could become available as creams and help prevent the change of moles to melanomas. Our study identifies MAP kinase as a pathway that must be targeted in the prevention and treatment of melanoma."

Holly Korschun | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.emory.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
10.12.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

nachricht UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread
06.12.2018 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>