Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New broccoli compound appears promising against breast cancer

19.08.2002


In the future, a "broccoli-pill" a day may help keep breast cancer at bay. Researchers have developed a new compound, designed from a known anticancer agent found in broccoli, that shows promise as a breast cancer preventive.



Apparently less toxic than its natural counterpart, the compound could be marketed for cancer prevention, the researchers say. Their findings were described at the 224th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

Tests in animals have shown encouraging results, but no human studies have been done. If tests confirm the findings, the compound could be developed into a once-a-day pill or vitamin component for cancer prevention and perhaps be on the market in seven to ten years, the researchers say.


"It may be easier to take a cancer-prevention pill once a day rather than rely on massive quantities of fruits and vegetables," says Jerry Kosmeder, Ph.D., research assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago and an investigator in the study.

Called oxomate, the synthetic compound works like its natural counterpart, sulforaphane, which was recently identified as a cancer-preventive agent in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables (such as cabbage and Brussels sprouts). Both compounds boost the body’s production of phase II enzymes, which can detoxify cancer-causing chemicals and reduce cancer risk.

But the natural broccoli compound, sulforaphane, can be toxic in high doses, warns Kosmeder. He cites laboratory studies in which the compound, above certain levels, killed cultured animal cells. It is also difficult and expensive to synthesize. These factors make sulforaphane a poor candidate for drug development, he said.

Kosmeder designed oxomate to be less toxic than its parent compound by removing the chemical components that appear to be responsible for this toxicity. In tests on cultured liver cells, oxomate was seven times less toxic than sulforaphane, the researcher said. The synthetic compound is also cheaper and easier to produce, he added.

In tests on female rats, those that were fed oxomate after exposure to cancer-inducing chemicals had up to a 50 percent reduction in the number of breast tumors compared to rats that did not receive the compound, said Kosmeder.

After the initial discovery of sulforaphane as a broccoli component (by researchers at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore), consumers have been urged to eat more of the vegetable and its close relatives to obtain its cancer-fighting benefit. For those who don’t like to eat the familiar green stalks and their bushy flowerets, consumers have a growing number of dietary options, including sprouts, teas and tablets made from natural concentrates.

Kosmeder believes that these variations present a dosing challenge, as not all broccoli-derived products contain the same amount of sulforaphane. This is due to variations in the vegetable’s processing, growing conditions and strain, he said.

"Oxomate would give you a definitive benefit; you’d know exactly how much you’re getting everyday, its exact benefit and risk," the researcher says.

Oxomate could be taken along with other cancer preventive agents, including nutrients and drugs, in an effort to maximize protection, he said.

Tamoxifen is currently the only FDA approved drug for breast cancer prevention in high-risk women. It works by a different mechanism from oxomate’s. Tamoxifen helps a woman who has estrogen-dependent tumors, but may not help those with non-estrogen-dependent tumors, says Kosmeder. A drug based on oxomate would help prevent cancer formation regardless of whether the tumor is estrogen-dependent or non-estrogen-dependent, he says.

If subsequent tests for preventing other types of cancer prove effective, then oxomate might be useful for anyone who is at increased risk of cancer due to exposure to cancer-causing agents, according to Kosmeder. The drug would be particularly beneficial for those at highest risk, such as smokers, he says.

Consumers are still urged to continue eating healthful amounts of fruits and vegetables and to reduce their exposure to cancer risk factors, such as smoking, the researcher says.

Kosmeder conducted his oxomate studies as part of a research team headed by John M. Pezzuto, Ph.D., head of the department of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy at the university and deputy director of its Cancer Center.


The National Cancer Institute provided funding for this study.
The poster on this research, MEDI 98, will be presented at 8:00 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 18, at the Hynes Convention Center, Hall B, during a general poster session, and at 8:00 p.m., Monday, Aug. 19, at the Hynes Convention Center, Hall B, during Sci-Mix).

Jerry Kosmeder, Ph.D., is a research assistant professor in department of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

John M. Pezzuto, Ph.D., is head of the department of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is also deputy director of the university’s Cancer Center.

Charmayne Marsh | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Infants later diagnosed with autism follow adults’ gaze, but seldom initiate joint attention
24.05.2019 | Schwedischer Forschungsrat - The Swedish Research Council

nachricht When wheels and heads are spinning - DFG research project on motion sickness in automated driving
22.05.2019 | Technische Universität Berlin

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature

A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

The most complete assessment ever of statistical uncertainty within the GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP) data product shows that the annual values...

Im Focus: The geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical Review Letters and the related theory in Physical Review B.

The spin of an electron is a promising candidate for use as the smallest information unit (qubit) of a quantum computer. Controlling and switching this spin or...

Im Focus: Self-repairing batteries

UTokyo engineers develop a way to create high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers at the University of Tokyo continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Professor Atsuo Yamada and his team recently developed a...

Im Focus: Quantum Cloud Computing with Self-Check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

Many scientists are currently working on investigating how quantum advantage can be exploited on hardware already available today. Three years ago, physicists...

Im Focus: Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

However a major challenge in developing these technologies is that the quantum phenomena are very fragile, and only a handful of physical systems have been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

First dust conference in the Central Asian part of the earth’s dust belt

15.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

On Mars, sands shift to a different drum

24.05.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema

24.05.2019 | Medical Engineering

Chemical juggling with three particles

24.05.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>