Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Penn researchers find Epstein Barr-like virus infects and may cause cancer in dogs

13.03.2012
More than 90 percent of humans have antibodies to the Epstein Barr virus. Best known for causing mononucleosis, or "the kissing disease," the virus has also been implicated in more serious conditions, including Hodgkin's, non-Hodgkin's and Burkitt's lymphomas. Yet little is known about exactly how EBV triggers these diseases.

Now a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and Penn's Perelman School of Medicine has the first evidence that an Epstein Barr-like virus can infect and may also be responsible for causing lymphomas in man's best friend.

The findings suggest that domestic dogs possess a similar biology to humans with respect to EBV infection. That could allow scientists to study dogs to help uncover the mechanisms by which EBV leads to cancer in certain people.

"There are no large-animal spontaneous models of EBV infection and virus-associated disease, and most studies investigating viral disease are performed in non-human primates, which are very expensive," said Nicola Mason, senior author of the study and an assistant professor of medicine and pathobiology at Penn Vet. "Discovering that dogs can get infected with this virus like people do may provide us with a long-sought-after model for EBV-associated disease."

Mason's team at Penn Vet included Shih-Hung Huang, Philip Kozak, Jessica Kim, George Habineza-Ndikuyeze, Charles Meade, Anita Gaurnier-Hausser and Reema Patel. The team worked closely with Erle Robertson, professor of microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine.

Their work was published online March 8 in the journal Virology.

In humans, the Epstein Barr virus infects B cells. After an acute phase of infection, of which many people are not even aware, the virus goes into a latent phase. Most people show no symptoms during this phase, but, in some, EBV promotes unnatural growth of B cells, which contributes to the development of lymphoma.

Meanwhile, dogs develop lymphomas that share some characteristics with the human equivalents. These conditions are relatively common in certain breeds. In golden retrievers, for instance, one out of every eight dogs develops lymphoma.

Yet, "the paradigm up until now was that EBV only infects humans," Mason said. "It is an extremely successful virus, and most people are infected. Since humans and domestic dogs have cohabited for around 15,000 years, we hypothesized that the virus may have adapted to another host. "

To search for evidence of infection, Mason and colleagues obtained samples of blood from client-owned dogs of various breeds brought to Penn Vet for care. In 48 dogs with lymphoma and 41 without the disease, the researchers first looked to see if the pets had antibodies against proteins specific to the EBV capsid, the protein shell of the virus. The test is nearly identical to one that physicians use to detect exposure to EBV in humans.

The researchers observed that eight of the dogs with lymphoma and three of those without it had high levels of antibodies against EBV proteins, indicating that a portion of the dogs had been exposed to a virus very similar to EBV.

While the presence of antibodies confirms that a dog has been exposed to a virus, the team wanted to know whether the virus had a direct association with the tumors in dogs with lymphoma. Finding viral elements, including DNA, within lymphomas in humans is an indication that the tumor is associated with the virus, therefore Penn researchers looked to see if they could find virus in the dog tumors.

Using the polymerase chain reaction, which amplifies specific DNA sequences, the researchers analyzed lymph nodes of dogs with and without B cell lymphoma. In two dogs with lymphoma, they were able to identify a portion of DNA very similar to a sequence in EBV. They found no evidence of the same DNA in the healthy dogs.

They repeated similar tests with other stretches of EBV DNA, finding evidence of EBV-like DNA in the cancer cells of three of nine dogs with lymphoma. They also identified a virus-associated protein in the malignant lymph nodes of two of nine dogs with lymphoma.

Finally, examining cancerous B cells under an electron microscope revealed what appeared to be viral particles, similar to what what has been seen in the tumor cells of humans with EBV-linked lymphomas.

Taken together, the researchers' discoveries indicate that some dogs are naturally infected with a virus similar or identical to EBV and that, as in humans, the virus appears linked in certain cases with canine lymphomas.

That such a large percentage of humans are exposed to EBV and yet only a small fraction develop cancers indicates that there may be a genetic component to EBV-associated cancer susceptibility.

"With additional studies within certain breeds of dog," Mason said, "we hope to provide insights into genetic factors that may predispose to virus associated lymphoma. Furthermore, this spontaneous dog model may help us evaluate new treatments for EBV-related lymphomas or investigate strategies to prevent those cancers from developing in the first place."

The study was supported by the University of Pennsylvania's Veterinary Center for Infectious Disease, the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania and the National Cancer Institute.

Katherine Unger Baillie | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.upenn.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Candidate Ebola vaccine still effective when highly diluted, macaque study finds
21.10.2019 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht Autism spectrum disorder risk linked to insufficient placental steroid
21.10.2019 | Children's National Hospital

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A cavity leads to a strong interaction between light and matter

Researchers have succeeded in creating an efficient quantum-mechanical light-matter interface using a microscopic cavity. Within this cavity, a single photon is emitted and absorbed up to 10 times by an artificial atom. This opens up new prospects for quantum technology, report physicists at the University of Basel and Ruhr-University Bochum in the journal Nature.

Quantum physics describes photons as light particles. Achieving an interaction between a single photon and a single atom is a huge challenge due to the tiny...

Im Focus: Solving the mystery of quantum light in thin layers

A very special kind of light is emitted by tungsten diselenide layers. The reason for this has been unclear. Now an explanation has been found at TU Wien (Vienna)

It is an exotic phenomenon that nobody was able to explain for years: when energy is supplied to a thin layer of the material tungsten diselenide, it begins to...

Im Focus: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

The nanocosmos is constantly in motion. All natural processes are ultimately determined by the interplay between radiation and matter. Light strikes particles...

Im Focus: Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy of scientific study is that, being so tiny, they exhibit quantum mechanical properties not possible with larger objects.

Researchers at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE's Argonne National...

Im Focus: Novel Material for Shipbuilding

A new research project at the TH Mittelhessen focusses on the development of a novel light weight design concept for leisure boats and yachts. Professor Stephan Marzi from the THM Institute of Mechanics and Materials collaborates with Krake Catamarane, which is a shipyard located in Apolda, Thuringia.

The project is set up in an international cooperation with Professor Anders Biel from Karlstad University in Sweden and the Swedish company Lamera from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

International Symposium on Functional Materials for Electrolysis, Fuel Cells and Metal-Air Batteries

02.10.2019 | Event News

NEXUS 2020: Relationships Between Architecture and Mathematics

02.10.2019 | Event News

Optical Technologies: International Symposium „Future Optics“ in Hannover

19.09.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

New deep-water coral discovered

22.10.2019 | Life Sciences

DNA-reeling bacteria yield new insight on how superbugs acquire drug-resistance

22.10.2019 | Life Sciences

Heat Pumps with Climate-Friendly Refrigerant Developed for Indoor Installation

22.10.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>