Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Orthopedic Clinic of JGU Medical Center deploys new system for therapy of metastatic spinal tumors

11.07.2011
New method allows for the concurrent treatment of spinal tumors and stabilization of the spine

The Orthopedic Clinic and Policlinic at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), Germany has recently deployed a new system for the treatment of spinal tumors for the first time.

This treatment is a combination of the so-called radiofrequency ablation, which uses the heat energy of radio frequency waves to ablate and destroy tumors, and a subsequent kyphoplasty, by which the spine is stabilized through the injection of bone cement as filler material. A recently started single-center study involving 10 evaluable patients suffering from painful metastatic spinal tumors is now expected to provide information about the efficacy of this method.

"The results of this trial will provide critical information about the safety and efficacy of minimally invasive targeted radiofrequency ablation to treat vertebral metastates," says Professor Dr med Andreas Kurth, Director of the Orthopedic Clinic at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. "We are confident that this advanced method employed for tumor reduction and simultaneous stabilization of the spine through bone-sparing kyphoplasty will minimize the cancer patient's severe discomfort while stabilizing the vertebra."

The Spinal Tumor Ablation with Radiofrequency (STAR)TM System of DFINE, Inc., which was jointly developed with the Orthopedic Clinic of Mainz University Medical Center, is already FDA-approved as a device permitting minimally invasive targeted tumor necrosis of metastatic spinal tumors. Following ablation with the STAR System, vertebra(e) will be stabilized with ultra-high viscosity cement. This minimally invasive procedure generally takes about an hour. The data to be perceived from the Evaluation of Combined RF Ablation and Cement Delivery in Painful Tumors of the Spine Trial (AbCT) are to support the filing for Conformité Européenne (CE) Mark certification in 2012.

In the United States alone, 13 percent (190,000 cases) of the 1.5 million new cancer cases diagnosed annually will develop spinal mestasis. Beyond narcotic administration and traditional pain management, the primary modality for treating spinal metastases is external beam radiation. While this represents the current standard of care for treating metastatic cancer, pain relief often requires multiple treatments and weeks to be effective. In addition, radiation therapy often requires that patients suspend chemotherapy treatment of the primary cancer due to cumulative toxicity. Using the DFINE minimally invasive procedure to treat painful metastatic spinal lesions provides immediate pain relief and an improved quality of life. There is also minimal, if any, delay in systemic, curative therapy of the primary cancer therapy - a significant benefit for the patient.

The STARTM System of DFINE incorporates a unique bipolar navigational instrument, which offers unparalleled control and enables the physician to overcome many of the technical challenges which have limited targeted ablation in boney tissues to date. "Due to the critical anatomy in the spine and the invasive nature of conventional surgical procedures to treat spinal metastases, we believe DFINE's minimally invasive therapy that allows targeted delivery of radiofrequency energy for ablation of tumors may provide the fastest and most effective relief from the painful effects of spinal metastases, and thereby represents a significant advance in the patient's treatment," states Kurth.

About the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany
The University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) is the only institution of its kind in the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. The Orthopedic University Clinic and Policlinic is one of the oldest and most-respected centers in Germany, focusing on the research of orthopedic oncology and cancer of the musculoskeletal system. Teaching and research are closely linked with medical care facilities. Some 3,500 students are at any one time attending courses on medicine and dentistry at Mainz.

For further information, please visit www.unimedizin-mainz.de.

About DFINE, Inc.
DFINE is dedicated to relieving pain and improving the quality of life for patients suffering from vertebral pathologies through innovative, minimally invasive therapies. DFINE’s devices are built upon an extensible radio frequency (RF) platform that presently covers two procedural applications. The first application, the StabiliT® Vertebral Augmentation System and StabiliT® ER2 Bone Cement, harnesses the power of radiofrequency energy to repair fractured vertebrae. The company has received FDA 510(k) clearance for a second application, the STARTM Ablation System, for the treatment of spinal tumors and plans to submit for CE-Mark approval following completion of the AbCT Study at Mainz University Medical Center. The STAR system will be commercially available in the United States later this year. DFINE is based in San Jose, Calif. and is privately held.

For more information, visit www.dfineinc.com

Petra Giegerich | idw
Further information:
http://www.unimedizin-mainz.de

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness
11.07.2018 | McGill University

nachricht Direct conversion of non-neuronal cells into nerve cells
03.07.2018 | Universitätsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino

16.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

16.07.2018 | Life Sciences

New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

16.07.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>