Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Legislation introduced to guarantee free colorectal cancer screening for all medicare beneficiaries

02.03.2012
During Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, societies urge Congress to pass the 'Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012'

Colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening saves lives, but a loophole in current Medicare law may cause patients to think twice before undergoing this vital test. Legislation introduced today seeks to ensure that colorectal cancer screening for all Medicare beneficiaries is free, as intended.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act waives the coinsurance and deductible for many cancer screening testsi, including colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT), which screen for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy is a unique screening test because gastroenterologists are able to remove precancerous polyps and small cancers during the screening procedure. Under Medicare billing rules, removal of any polyp reclassifies the screening as a therapeutic procedure, for which patients will receive an unexpected coinsurance bill.

The Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012 introduced today by Rep. Charlie Dent, R-PA, waives the coinsurance for a screening colonoscopy regardless of whether a polyp or lesion is found. Under current Medicare policy, the beneficiary deductible is waived regardless of whether a polyp or lesion is found. Congressman Dent's bill applies the same rational policy to beneficiary coinsurance.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) have been advocating for the past year and half that Congress corrects this "cost-sharing" problem, which continues to cause confusion for patients and providers.

Cost sharing creates financial barriers, which could discourage the use of colonoscopy. The Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012 is critical to achieving higher screening rates and reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Almost 38 percent of U.S. adults age 50 and older have never been screened, despite the fact that removing precancerous polyps cuts the death rate from colorectal cancer by half.

Christopher W. Hansen, president, ACS CAN

"I commend Representative Dent for this important effort to ensure that everyone has access to life saving cancer screenings, without regard to their ability pay. Too many Americans are going without lifesaving screenings because they cannot afford it. We urge Congress to help stop a cancer that can be prevented in many cases."

Lawrence S. Kim, MD, AGAF, Community Private Practice Councillor

"The rate of colorectal cancers and deaths can be decreased through the increased use of screening. However, a majority of Americans are still not participating in these lifesaving tests. The Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act of 2012 will provide consistency and security for patients seeking colorectal cancer screenings by eliminating financial barriers and removing the confusion facing patients and their physicians over the current health-care policy. The bill introduced by Rep. Dent will help us to continue to increase the strides being made in colorectal cancer screening and, most importantly, save lives."

Gregory G. Ginsberg, MD, FASGE, president, American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

"Colorectal cancer is a largely preventable disease. The greatest benefit of colonoscopy screening is removing polyps that are discovered during screening and by so doing, significantly decreasing the risk for later cancer development. Converting a screening procedure that is fully covered by insurance with no cost-sharing, to one that does require cost-sharing by the patient after a polyp is found, is both a barrier to screening and inconsistent with the goal of the preventive services provision. We call upon Congress to pass this bill to fully eliminate the cost burden of colonoscopy colorectal cancer screening by waiving cost-sharing in the event that a polyp or cancer is removed."

About the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network

ACS CAN, the nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society, supports evidence-based policy and legislative solutions designed to eliminate cancer as a major health problem. ACS CAN works to encourage elected officials and candidates to make cancer a top national priority. ACS CAN gives ordinary people extraordinary power to fight cancer with the training and tools they need to make their voices heard. For more information, visit http://www.acscan.org.

About the American Gastroenterological Association

The American Gastroenterological Association is the trusted voice of the GI community. Founded in 1897, the AGA has grown to include 17,000 members from around the globe who are involved in all aspects of the science, practice and advancement of gastroenterology. The AGA Institute administers the practice, research and educational programs of the organization. http://www.gastro.org. Become an AGA fan on Facebook. Join our LinkedIn group. Follow us on Twitter @AmerGastroAssn.

About the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

Since its founding in 1941, the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has been dedicated to advancing patient care and digestive health by promoting excellence in gastrointestinal endoscopy. ASGE, with nearly 12,000 members worldwide, promotes the highest standards for endoscopic training and practice, fosters endoscopic research, recognizes distinguished contributions to endoscopy, and is the foremost resource for endoscopic education. Visit http://www.asge.org and http://www.screen4coloncancer.org for more information and to find a qualified doctor in your area.

i Sec. 4104 of the "Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act" (ACA) waives the beneficiary coinsurance and deductible for covered preventive services that have a grade "A" or "B" from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). Colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) have all been assigned an "A" rating from the USPSTF for adults beginning at age 50 and continuing until age 75.

Sec. 4104 also requires, effective Jan. 1, 2011, the deductible for colorectal cancer screenings be waived for Medicare beneficiaries regardless of the code that is billed for the establishment of a diagnosis as a result of the test, of for the removal of tissue or other matter or other procedure that is furnished in connection with, as a result of, and in the same clinical encounter as a screening test.

Jessica Duncan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gastro.org

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material

New insight into the spin behavior in an exotic state of matter puts us closer to next-generation spintronic devices

Aside from the deep understanding of the natural world that quantum physics theory offers, scientists worldwide are working tirelessly to bring forth a...

Im Focus: Excitation of robust materials

Kiel physics team observed extremely fast electronic changes in real time in a special material class

In physics, they are currently the subject of intensive research; in electronics, they could enable completely new functions. So-called topological materials...

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

X-ray scattering shines light on protein folding

10.07.2020 | Life Sciences

Looking at linkers helps to join the dots

10.07.2020 | Materials Sciences

Surprisingly many peculiar long introns found in brain genes

10.07.2020 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>