Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Hypnosis extends restorative slow-wave sleep

02.06.2014

Deep sleep promotes our well-being, improves our memory and strengthens the body’s defences. Zurich and Fribourg researchers demonstrate how restorative SWS can also be increased without medication – using hypnosis.

Sleeping well is a crucial factor contributing to our physical and mental restoration. SWS in particular has a positive impact for instance on memory and the functioning of the immune system. During periods of SWS, growth hormones are secreted, cell repair is promoted and the defence system is stimulated. If you feel sick or have had a hard working day, you often simply want to get some good, deep sleep. A wish that you can’t influence through your own will – so the widely held preconception.

Sleep researchers from the Universities of Zurich and Fribourg now prove the opposite. In a study that has now been published in the scientific journal “Sleep”, they have demonstrated that hypnosis has a positive impact on the quality of sleep, to a surprising extent. “It opens up new, promising opportunities for improving the quality of sleep without drugs”, says biopsychologist Björn Rasch who heads the study at the Psychological Institute of the University of Zurich in conjunction with the “Sleep and Learning” project (see box).

Brain waves ­– an indicator of sleep quality

... more about:
»activity »drugs »hypnosis »neutral »sleep

Hypnosis is a method that can influence processes which are very difficult to control voluntarily. Patients with sleep disturbances can indeed be successfully treated with hypnotherapy. However, up to now it hadn’t been proven that this can lead to an objectively measurable change in sleep. To objectively measure sleep, electrical brain activity is recorded using an electroencephalogram (EEG). The characteristic feature of slow-wave sleep, which is deemed to have high restorative capacity, is a very even and slow oscillation in electrical brain activity.

70 healthy young women took part in the UZH study. They came to the sleep laboratory for a 90-minute midday nap. Before falling asleep they listened to a special 13-minute slow-wave sleep hypnosis tape over loudspeakers, developed by hypnotherapist Professor Angelika Schlarb, a sleep specialist, or to a neutral spoken text. At the beginning of the experiment the subjects were divided into highly suggestible and low suggestible groups using a standard procedure (Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility). Around half of the population is moderately suggestible. With this method women achieve on average higher values for hypnotic susceptibility than men. Nevertheless, the researchers expect the same positive effects on sleep for highly suggestible men.

Slow-wave sleep increased by 80 percent

In their study, sleep researchers Maren Cordi and Björn Rasch were able to prove that highly suggestible women experienced 80 percent more slow-wave sleep after listening to the hypnosis tape compared with sleep after listening to the neutral text. In parallel, time spent awake was reduced by around one-third. In contrast to highly suggestible women, low suggestible female participants did not benefit as much from hypnosis. With additional control experiments the psychologists confirmed that the beneficial impact of hypnosis on slow-wave sleep could be attributed to the hypnotic suggestion to “sleep deeper” and could not be reduced to mere expectancy effects.

According to psychologist Maren Cordi “the results may be of major importance for patients with sleep problems and for older adults. In contrast to many sleep-inducing drugs, hypnosis has no adverse side effects”. Basically, everyone who responds to hypnosis could benefit from improved sleep through hypnosis.

Further reading:
Maren Cordi, Angelika Schlarb, Björn Rasch. Deepening sleep by hypnotic suggestions. Sleep. 37(6). June 1, 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.5665/sleep.3778

Sleep and Learning

The project “Sleep and Learning” is headed by Professor Björn Rasch from the University of Fribourg and conducted at the Universities of Zurich and Fribourg. The project is financed by the Swiss National Fund and the University of Zurich (main area of clinical research “Sleep and Health”). The goal of the project is to identify psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the positive role of sleep for our memory and mental health.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.mediadesk.uzh.ch

Bettina Jakob | Universität Zürich

Further reports about: activity drugs hypnosis neutral sleep

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
10.12.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

nachricht UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread
06.12.2018 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>