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Drugs that prevent blood clots may protect organs during transplantation

17.11.2014

Organs can become significantly damaged during transplantation, but a new article published in the BJS (British Journal of Surgery) offers a protective strategy that could keep them safe and allow them to function optimally after the procedure.

When an organ is transplanted from a donor to a recipient, there is a period of time when the organ is deprived of normal blood flow. While this in itself can cause tissue damage, additional damage may also occur when blood flow is restored to the organ due to a high risk of blood clotting.

Investigators led by Thierry Hauet, MD, PhD, of the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), the University of Poitiers, and the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) de Poitiers, in France, wondered whether anticoagulants or "blood thinners" might help protect transplant organs against these effects. The team tested the potential of fondaparinux in an experimental model of kidney transplantation. Use of the anticoagulant was linked with improved kidney function both immediately after transplantation and several months later.

"People die every day from the lack of available organs. This study demonstrates the benefits of anticoagulation therapy using new and original drugs at the time of organ collection," said Dr. Hauet. "Such therapy could augment the pool of available organs and allow for the safe use of marginal organs, which have characteristics associated with poorer outcomes or come from donors with medical complexities."

Such an anticoagulation strategy could be an important addition to current transplant protocols to limit tissue damage and improve outcomes in patients receiving kidney, liver, pancreas, lung, heart, and other organ transplants.

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This study is published in BJS. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact sciencenewsroom@wiley.com.

Full citation: Article: "Kidney graft outcome using an anti-Xa therapeutic strategy in an experimental model of severe ischaemia-reperfusion injury." S. Tillet, S. Giraud, P. O. Delpech, R. Thuillier, V. Ameteau, J. M. Goujon, B. Renelier, L. Macchi, T. Hauet, and G. Mauco. Br J Surg; Published Online: November 17, 2014 (DOI: 10.1002/bjs.9662)

URL Upon Publication: http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/bjs.9662

Author Contact: To arrange an interview please contact, Mr Didier Dubrana at didier.dubrana@inserm.fr; Mr Stephan Maret at stephan.maret@chu-poitiers.fr; or Mme Marion Sabourin at communication@univ-poitiers.fr.

About the Journal:

BJS is the premier peer-reviewed surgical journal in Europe and one of the top surgical periodicals in the world. Its international readership is reflected in its prestigious international Editorial Board, supported by a panel of over 1200 reviewers worldwide. BJS features the very best in clinical and laboratory-based research on all aspects of general surgery and related topics and has a tradition of publishing high quality papers in breast, upper GI, lower GI, vascular, endocrine and surgical sciences. Papers include leading articles, reviews and original research articles, correspondence and book reviews. The journal celebrated its centennial year in 2013. The current impact factor is 5.21. Visit http://www.bjs.co.uk  for more information.

About Wiley

Wiley is a global provider of content-enabled solutions that improve outcomes in research, education, and professional practice. Our core businesses produce scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, reference works, books, database services, and advertising; professional books, subscription products, certification and training services and online applications; and education content and services including integrated online teaching and learning resources for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners.

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (NYSE: JWa, JWb), has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 450 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace. Wiley's global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company's website can be accessed at http://www.wiley.com 

Evelyn Martinez | EurekAlert!

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