Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Two-Drug Combination May Slow Deadly Thyroid Cancer

09.01.2013
A combination of the drugs pazopanib and paclitaxel shows promise in slowing anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), according to a Mayo Clinic-led study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The two drugs together resulted in greater anti-cancer activity in ATC than either drug alone, says lead researcher Keith Bible, M.D., Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic oncologist.

Anaplastic thyroid cancer is a rare but devastating form of thyroid cancer that typically strikes men and women in their 60s and 70s. It is very aggressive, with a median survival of only about 5 months from time of diagnosis. Only 20 percent of patients survive a year beyond diagnosis, and it has historically been found to be resistant to most therapies.

Pazopanib, a kinase-inhibitor that interferes with the growth of cancer cells, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat renal cancer tumors. Paclitaxel is an FDA-approved chemotherapy drug that disrupts the machinery involved in cell division.

Researchers studied anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and tumors in cell culture and in animal models. Human ATC cells were readily killed, and ATC tumors implanted into mice were 50 percent smaller when treated with the combination in comparison to the response to treatment with either drug alone. Pilot therapy of one patient with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer using the combination also resulted in marked tumor shrinkage lasting over six months. "This was a highly unexpected finding for this type of aggressive tumor, which often can double in size in a matter of days," Dr. Bible says.

In previous studies, pazopanib alone was found not effective in the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer. Paclitaxel was added to address the aggressiveness of anaplastic thyroid cancer tumors and bolster anti-cancer effects. The team investigated how the two drugs might complement each other.

Monitoring cancer cells multiply in time-lapse video under a microscope, researchers noted that the drug combination resulted in abnormal cell division and an increase in ATC cell death. Although pazopanib had not been known to specifically affect cell division, researchers speculated that the drug might have another unrecognized molecular target within cancer cells.

"We ended up learning that pazopanib also happens to inhibit a protein involved in cell division known as aurora A; this property seems to be involved in producing enhanced effects when pazopanib is combined with paclitaxel," Dr. Bible says. "This finding suggests that the combination may also be useful in treating other cancers, such as breast cancer, in which aurora A is sometimes found to be present in elevated amounts, as it is in ATC," Dr. Bible says.

The results also prompted an ongoing randomized multicenter clinical trial, led by Mayo Clinic and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and administered through the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, testing the two-drug combination when added to radiation therapy in the initial treatment of patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer.

"This important next step is designed to determine whether the combination of drugs will improve ATC patient survival compared to paclitaxel alone," Dr. Bible says.

The research was funded by National Institutes of Health grants CA125750 and CA13666 and the State of Florida Department of Health Bankhead-Coley Cancer Program. Co-authors include Crescent Isham, Ayoko Bossou, Vivian Negron, Wilma Lingle, Ph.D., Vera Suman, Ph.D. of Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Robert Smallridge, M.D., John Copland, Ph.D., and Laura Marlow of Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla.; Kelly Fisher and Rakesh Kumar, Ph.D., of GlaxoSmithKline; and Eric Sherman, M.D., of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

About Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

As a leading institution funded by the National Cancer Institute, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center conducts basic, clinical and population science research, translating discoveries into improved methods for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. For information on cancer clinical trials, call 507-538-7623.

About Mayo Clinic
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. For more information, visit MayoClinic.com or MayoClinic.org/news.

Journalists can become a member of the Mayo Clinic News Network for the latest health, science and research news and access to video, audio, text and graphic elements that can be downloaded or embedded.

Joe Dangor | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mayo.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Potential seen for tailoring treatment for acute myeloid leukemia
10.12.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

nachricht UC San Diego researchers develop sensors to detect and measure cancer's ability to spread
06.12.2018 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>