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Depression increases death risk in coronary stent patients

16.03.2012
Depression increases the risk of death in patients who have a coronary stent implanted.

After seven years of follow up, depressed patients were 1.5 times more likely to have died than non-depressed patients. The findings were independent of age, gender, clinical characteristics, anxiety and the distressed (Type D) personality.

The research was presented at the 12th Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing, 16-17 March, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Depression has been associated with poor outcomes in coronary artery disease but previous studies have mainly looked at short term effects, primarily in patients who have had a myocardial infarction or a coronary bypass operation. The current study (FPN 17) investigated the impact of depression on mortality during a 7-year follow up period in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

For the study, 1,234 PCI patients aged 26-90 years (average age 62) from the Rapamycin- Eluting Stent Evaluated At Rotterdam Cardiology Hospital (RESEARCH) registry completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) to assess depression 6 months after having a stent implanted. The endpoint was all-cause mortality.

The prevalence of depression was 26.3% (324 out of 1234 patients). After 7 years there were 187 deaths in total (15.2%). The incidence of all-cause mortality in depressed patients was 23.5% (76 out of 324 patients) versus 12.2% (111 out of 910 patients) in non-depressed patients.

Depression was independently associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio=1.56; 95% confidence interval [1.03.35], p = .035) after adjusting for sociodemographics (age, gender), clinical characteristics, anxiety and the Type D personality. Clinical characteristics included type of stent (drug eluting/bare metal), number of vessels obstructed, body mass index, past cardiac surgery or myocardial infarction, indication for the PCI procedure, coronary risk factors (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking) and cardiac medications (aspirin, ACE inhibitors, beta blockers, calcium antagonists, diuretics, nitrates and statins).

Male gender, older age, and diabetes mellitus were also significantly associated with an increased risk of death after 7 years of follow up, whereas statins were associated with a reduced risk. Anxiety and Type D personality had no significant effect on all-cause mortality.

"The main finding is that patients who are depressed after coronary stenting have a worse prognosis," says lead author Nikki Damen, a PhD student at Tilburg University in the Netherlands. "They die earlier than non-depressed patients."

The reasons for the finding are under investigation. One possible explanation is that depressed patients may have less healthy lifestyles with regard to smoking, drinking alcohol, physical activity, and diet, and may be less likely to take their medications. Another possible explanation is that depression could alter the activity of the sympathetic nervous system, leading to increases in heart rate and blood pressure.

"Doctors and nurses have traditionally focussed on medical factors like diabetes or family history of cardiovascular disease when assessing PCI patients' risk of death, but that's not the whole picture," says Ms Damen. "Psychological factors do matter as well, in combination with the medical factors."

She adds: "More research is needed to determine how to screen for depression in cardiovascular patients, and then how to provide treatment."

Authors: ESC Press Office
Tel: +33 (0) 4 92 94 86 27
Fax: +33 (0) 4 92 94 86 69
Email: press@escardio.org
Notes to editor
About the Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing
The Annual Spring Meeting on Cardiovascular Nursing is the yearly meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). This year's meeting was organised jointly with the Professional Society for Cardiovascular and Thorax Surgery Nurses, based in Denmark.

About the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP)

The CCNAP aims to promote excellence in Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions through practice education and research. In addition to nurses, allied health professionals belonging to the CCNAP include physiotherapists, dieticians, psychologists, cath lab technicians, imaging and diagnostic technicians and therapists working in rehabilitation and prevention. The CCNAP is one of five Councils of the European Society of Cardiology.

About the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)

The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents 75,000 cardiology professionals across Europe and the Mediterranean. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.

References

Depression is independently associated with 7-year mortality in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention: results from the reseach registry

ESC Press Office | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.escario.org

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