Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

ASCO: Emerging trends in radiation therapy for women over 70 with early stage breast cancer

03.06.2011
ASCO Merit Award

Patterns of radiation usage in breast conserving therapy for women 70 years and older with stage I breast cancer are changing: more women are opting for radioactive implants and those with estrogen positive tumors are opting out of radiation therapy, according to an abstract being presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago by Thomas Jefferson University Hospital researchers on Saturday, June 4. The abstract (#6094) received an ASCO Merit Award.

In another abstract (#1037), the researchers report that women with estrogen negative tumors were 91 percent more likely to die from breast cancer if they did not receive radiation therapy after a lumpectomy.

Given the relatively recent developments in radiation therapy (i.e., an increased use of brachytherapy and external beams) and data supporting the idea that radiation isn't necessary for women with estrogen positive tumors, researchers wanted to see how actual practice patterns were impacted.

Researchers found that there was a modest increase in the percentage of women with estrogen receptor positive cancers who did not get radiation therapy starting around 2004, and increasing use of radioactive implants, such the MammoSite, Contura, Savi or similar devices, since 2002.

There was also a corresponding drop in women who received external beam radiation, according to Xinglei Shen, M.D., a resident in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. "Among women with estrogen receptor negative cancers, there was not the same increase in frequency of women who did not get radiation, but there was an increased use of radioactive implants," he said.

The consequence of those findings was determining what impact omitting radiation has on survival. While there is data that the omission of radiation therapy in women with estrogen receptor positive tumors who receive endocrine therapy, such as Tamoxifen, is not associated with a survival difference, limited data exists for estrogen receptor negative tumors in older women who undergo breast conservation.

"From the randomized trial data, we know that women with estrogen receptor positive stage I breast cancer have no detriment to survival by avoiding radiation, as long as they took Tamoxifen," Dr. Shen said. "However, it is unknown if this would be the case in women with estrogen receptor negative cancer."

Dr. Shen worked with Jefferson Medical College student Andrzej Wojcieszynski to examine survival in these women, and found that they were 91 percent more likely to die from breast cancer if they did not receive radiation therapy after a lumpectomy. (Abstract #1037).

"We have to be cautious when interpreting survival data from the SEER because of potential confounding variables, such as the health of the patients and use of chemotherapy," Dr. Shen said. "However, these data do raise hypotheses for future study."

"Our conclusion is that adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy reduces breast cancer mortality in women over 70 with stage I, estrogen receptor negative breast cancers, and that radiation is currently underutilized in these women," said Wojcieszynski.

The Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson is one of a select group of National Cancer Institute-designated Clinical Cancer Centers in the nation. It was founded in 1991 with approximately 30 investigators in basic sciences. Today, the KCC has approximately 150 members that include physicians and scientists dedicated to discovery and development of novel approaches for cancer treatment.

Thomas Jefferson University, the largest freestanding academic medical center in Philadelphia, is composed of Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson College of Graduate Studies, Jefferson School of Population Health, Jefferson School of Health Professions, Jefferson School of Pharmacy, and Jefferson School of Nursing. Jefferson is regarded nationally as one of the best universities offering a range of comprehensive programs for the education of health professions. Thomas Jefferson University partners with Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, its education and clinical care affiliate.

Steve Graff | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jefferson.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht UC San Diego cancer scientists identify new drug target for multiple tumor types
12.07.2019 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Bacteria engineered as Trojan horse for cancer immunotherapy
04.07.2019 | Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

Im Focus: Artificial neural network resolves puzzles from condensed matter physics: Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking...

Im Focus: Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Bayreuth researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bayreuth has produced a previously unknown material: Rhenium nitride pernitride. Thanks to combining properties that were previously considered incompatible, it looks set to become highly attractive for technological applications. Indeed, it is a super-hard metallic conductor that can withstand extremely high pressures like a diamond. A process now developed in Bayreuth opens up the possibility of producing rhenium nitride pernitride and other technologically interesting materials in sufficiently large quantity for their properties characterisation. The new findings are presented in "Nature Communications".

The possibility of finding a compound that was metallically conductive, super-hard, and ultra-incompressible was long considered unlikely in science. It was...

Im Focus: Modelling leads to the optimum size for platinum fuel cell catalysts: Activity of fuel cell catalysts doubled

An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has built platinum nanoparticles for catalysis in fuel cells: The new size-optimized catalysts are twice as good as the best process commercially available today.

Fuel cells may well replace batteries as the power source for electric cars. They consume hydrogen, a gas which could be produced for example using surplus...

Im Focus: The secret of mushroom colors

Mushrooms: Darker fruiting bodies in cold climates

The fly agaric with its red hat is perhaps the most evocative of the diverse and variously colored mushroom species. Hitherto, the purpose of these colors was...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on UV LED Technologies & Applications – ICULTA 2020 | Call for Abstracts

24.06.2019 | Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

For bacteria, the neighbors co-determine which cell dies first: The physiology of survival

17.07.2019 | Life Sciences

Harvesting energy from the human knee

17.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Neutrino-Observatorium IceCube am Südpol wird ausgebaut

17.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>