Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study reveals: imaging software syngo.via helps save time without compromising accuracy

16.05.2012
Siemens Healthcare conducted a study with six customers in Germany, Austria and Spain to quantitatively and qualitatively measure the efficiency of the software syngo.via compared to a conventional Advanced Visualization workstation.

The study results illustrate that syngo.via can significantly help to save time when reading medical images, without compromising accuracy. For example, the observed average time savings from syngo.via for CT Cardiac amounted to 77 percent compared to other reading solutions.

Additionally, the participating clinicians stated that syngo.via is performing better regarding usability than comparable software. Siemens Healthcare announced in its global initiative Agenda 2013 to drive the development of efficiency increasing healthcare IT solutions. For a clinical institution to be successful, it is essential to obtain the highest possible diagnostic accuracy while maintaining a fast and efficient workflow. The 3D reading and advanced visualization software syngo.via enables clinicians to meet the respective requirements by automatically loading for example CT or MR images into the appropriate application and sorting them into the disease-specific corresponding layout. Manual work steps are eliminated and the clinician can start diagnosing immediately. Siemens designed the syngo.via efficiency study with regard to following questions: What are the time benefits of using syngo.via compared to other reading software for a specific set of images? And which qualitative aspects in the use of syngo.via improve the diagnostic reading process?

Six medical sites participated in the efficiency study which took account of a total number of seven different clinical workflows. To reflect their clinical routine, each participating site determined the case mix and measured 10 to 20 cases per workflow. The analysis of the study data revealed that the use of syngo.via can achieve time savings and patient-centric productivity gains in all of the observed workflows. For example, the observed average time savings from syngo.via for CT Cardiac amounted to 77 percent and for an Oncology Diagnosis with PET/CT to 45 percent. Using percent average time savings, respectively. Analysis of images for CT Vascular was 27 percent and image evaluation for PET/CT and CT Oncology Follow-Up 30 and 16 percent faster compared to a conventional advanced visualization or PACS workstation.

Additionally, Siemens conducted a usability survey among the study participants. They stated that syngo.via is performing better regarding the aspects data preparation, usability of viewing and measurement tools and documentation and reporting than the former software. “syngo.via is an excellent tool to increase the productivity of radiologists working on cardiac images," said Professor Gudrun Feuchtner from Innsbruck University Hospital in Austria, for example.

All information regarding the syngo.via study can be found here: www.siemens.com/syngo.via-efficiency

Launched by Siemens Healthcare Sector in November 2011, Agenda 2013 is a two-year global initiative to further strengthen the Healthcare Sector's innovative power and competitiveness. Specific measures will be implemented in four fields of action: Innovation, Competitiveness, Regional Footprint, and People Development.

The outcomes achieved by the Siemens customers during the syngo.via Efficiency Study were achieved in the customer's unique setting. Since there is no "typical" hospital and many variables exist (e.g. hospital size, case mix, level of IT adoption) please be aware that we cannot guarantee, warrant or represent that others will actually achieve the shown time savings and patient-centric productivity.

The Siemens Healthcare Sector is one of the world's largest suppliers to the healthcare industry and a trendsetter in medical imaging, laboratory diagnostics, medical information technology and hearing aids. Siemens offers its customers products and solutions for the entire range of patient care from a single source – from prevention and early detection to diagnosis, and on to treatment and aftercare. By optimizing clinical workflows for the most common diseases, Siemens also makes healthcare faster, better and more cost-effective. Siemens Healthcare employs some 51,000 employees worldwide and operates around the world. In fiscal year 2011 (to September 30), the Sector posted revenue of 12.5 billion euros and profit of around 1.3 billion euros.

Stefanie Schiller | Siemens Healthcare
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/healthcare
http://www.siemens.com/syngo.via-efficiency

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Stretchable, wearable coils may make MRI, other medical tests easier on patients
26.02.2020 | Purdue University

nachricht Therapies without drugs
25.02.2020 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration IZM

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: High-pressure scientists in Bayreuth discover promising material for information technology

Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have discovered an unusual material: When cooled down to two degrees Celsius, its crystal structure and electronic properties change abruptly and significantly. In this new state, the distances between iron atoms can be tailored with the help of light beams. This opens up intriguing possibilities for application in the field of information technology. The scientists have presented their discovery in the journal "Angewandte Chemie - International Edition". The new findings are the result of close cooperation with partnering facilities in Augsburg, Dresden, Hamburg, and Moscow.

The material is an unusual form of iron oxide with the formula Fe₅O₆. The researchers produced it at a pressure of 15 gigapascals in a high-pressure laboratory...

Im Focus: From China to the South Pole: Joining forces to solve the neutrino mass puzzle

Study by Mainz physicists indicates that the next generation of neutrino experiments may well find the answer to one of the most pressing issues in neutrino physics

Among the most exciting challenges in modern physics is the identification of the neutrino mass ordering. Physicists from the Cluster of Excellence PRISMA+ at...

Im Focus: Therapies without drugs

Fraunhofer researchers are investigating the potential of microimplants to stimulate nerve cells and treat chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, or Parkinson’s disease. Find out what makes this form of treatment so appealing and which challenges the researchers still have to master.

A study by the Robert Koch Institute has found that one in four women will suffer from weak bladders at some point in their lives. Treatments of this condition...

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

New molten metal hybrid filters from TU Freiberg will make components even safer and more resistant in the future

28.02.2020 | Materials Sciences

Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water

28.02.2020 | Life Sciences

Two NE tree species can be used in new sustainable building material

28.02.2020 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>