Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sprint Fidelis leads can be safely extracted in high-volume facilities

12.05.2011
Extraction of the Sprint Fidelis lead (Medtronic) can be safely performed in an experienced large volume center, according to research presented at the 2011 Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) conference in San Francisco last week.

The Sprint Fidelis lead has been associated with increased failure rate which resulted in the lead being removed from the market in 2007. However, even if the lead does not fail, physicians are tasked with the decision as to whether or not to prophylactically remove the Sprint Fidelis leads, explained the study's lead author Raed H. Abdelhadi, MD, a cardiac electrophysiologist at the Minneapolis Heart Institute® at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis.

While recent studies have shown a discrepancy in complication rates with Sprint Fidelis lead extraction, research has also demonstrated "unacceptable" failure rates, said Abdelhadi. However, there are a large number of these leads still implanted, as it was a popular lead when it was first approved by the FDA. At Minneapolis Heart Institute® alone, physicians implanted approximately 570 Sprint Fidelis leads.

"Traditionally, providers are hesitant to extract leads due to the reportedly high complication rates with the procedure," Abdelhadi explained.

Therefore, to better understand the complication rates and help guide management of patients with such leads, the researchers examined 148 patients with Medtronic Sprint Fidelis leads who underwent lead extraction at the Minneapolis Heart Institute® of Abbott Northwestern Hospital between April 2006 and July 2009.

According to the researchers, all procedures were performed by experienced electrophysiologists who met all of the training requirements set forth by the HRS.

Of the 148 Sprint Fidelis leads that were extracted, 46 percent were removed due to lead failure, 46 percent were removed prophylactically and 7 percent were removed due to infection. The average duration of the implanted leads was 36.2 months.

Of the extracted leads, 55 percent were removed by manual traction, 42 percent required the use Excimer laser sheath (SLS II, Spectranetics) and 3 percent were removed using mechanical sheaths.

All extractions were completed successfully, with no deaths or major complications associated with the extraction procedure, Abdelhadi reported.

Overall, there were three minor complications (two patients had thrombosis of the implant vein and one patient had pulmonary embolism, all were treated with anticoagulation) resulting in a 2 percent minor complication rate.

"Our results are consistent with a recent U.S. multi-center study, evaluating lead extraction among high-volume institutions," said Abdelhadi. "Understanding the actual complication rates is important because it can help providers to make decisions in properly managing this distinct patient population."

Minneapolis Heart Institute®

The Minneapolis Heart Institute® is recognized internationally as one of the world's leading providers of heart and vascular care. This state-of-the-art facility combines the finest in personalized patient care with sophisticated technology in a unique, family-oriented environment. The Institute's programs, a number of which are conducted in conjunction with Abbott Northwestern Hospital, address the full range of heart and vascular health needs: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation.

Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation

The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation is dedicated to creating a world without heart disease through groundbreaking clinical research and innovative education programs. MHIF's mission is to promote and improve cardiovascular health, quality of life and longevity for all.

Meghan Bethke | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mhif.org

Further reports about: Fidelis Heart Medtronic Minneapolis SPRINT Sprint Fidelis vascular health

More articles from Medical Engineering:

nachricht Can radar replace stethoscopes?
14.08.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht Novel PET imaging method could track and guide therapy for type 1 diabetes
03.08.2018 | Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

All articles from Medical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>